Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Long-term development of lens fluorescence in a twin cohort: Heritability and effects of age and lifestyle

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  1. Multi-modal and multi-scale clinical retinal imaging system with pupil and retinal tracking

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  2. Genotypic and Phenotypic Spectrum of Foveal Hypoplasia: A Multicenter Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  3. Increased incidence of mental disorders in children with cataract - findings from a population-based study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

  4. Socio-economic status in families affected by childhood cataract

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

View graph of relations

The blue-green autofluorescence of the ocular lens increases with age, glycemia and smoking, as the irreplaceable structural proteins of the lens slowly accumulate damage from the encounter with reactive molecular species. We have conducted a prospective study of lens autofluorescence over two decades in a twin cohort. The study included 131 phakic, non-diabetic adult twins (median age at follow-up 58 years, range 41-66 years) who were examined twice at an interval of 21 years. Change in anterior lens peak autofluorescence was analyzed in relation to age, current and baseline glycemia, cumulative smoking and heritability. The level of lens autofluorescence in the study population increased as a function of age and smoking (p ≤.002), but not as a function of glycemia (p ≥.069). Lens autofluorescence remained a highly heritable trait (90.6% at baseline and 93.3% at follow-up), but whereas the combined effect of age and cumulative smoking explained 57.2% of the variance in lens autofluorescence at baseline in mid-life, it only accounted for 31.6% at follow-up 21 years later. From mid to late adulthood, the level of blue-green fluorescence remained overwhelmingly heritable, but became less predictable from age, smoking habits and glycemic status. Presumably, as the lens ages, its intrinsic characteristics come to dominate over environmental and systemic factors, perhaps in a prelude to the development of cataract.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0268458
JournalPLoS One
Volume17
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)e0268458
ISSN1932-6203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

ID: 78261484