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Long-lasting alterations in adipose tissue density and adiponectin production in people living with HIV after thymidine analogues exposure

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  • Copenhagen Comorbidity in HIV Infection (COCOMO) Study
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BACKGROUND: Thymidine analogues (TA) and didanosine (ddI) are associated with long-lasting adipose tissue redistribution. Adiponectin is a widely used marker of adipocyte activity, and adipose tissue density assessed by CT-scan is associated with adipocyte size and function. We hypothesized that prior exposure to TA and ddI was associated with long-lasting adipose tissue dysfunction in people living with HIV (PLWH). Thus, we tested possible associations between markers of adipose tissue dysfunction (adipose tissue density and adiponectin) and prior exposure to TA and/or ddI, years after treatment discontinuation.

METHODS: Eight hundred forty-eight PLWH from the COCOMO study were included and stratified according to prior exposure to TA and/or ddI (with, n = 451; without n = 397). Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue area and density were determined by single slice abdominal CT-scan at lumbar 4th level. Venous blood was collected and analyzed for adiponectin. Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were used to test our hypotheses. Multivariable models were adjusted for age, sex, smoking, origin, physical activity, BMI, and adipose tissue area (VAT or SAT area, accordingly to the outcome).

RESULTS: prior exposure to TA and/or ddI was associated with excess risk of low VAT (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.74 [1.14; 2.67]) and SAT density (aOR 1.74 [1.18; 2.58]), for a given VAT and SAT area, respectively. No association between VAT and SAT density with time since TA and/or ddI discontinuation was found. 10 HU increase in VAT density was associated with higher adiponectin plasma level and this association was not modified by prior exposure to TA and/or ddI. Prior exposure to TA and/or ddI was associated with 9% lower [- 17;-2] plasma adiponectin levels and with excess risk of low adiponectin (aOR 1.74 [1.10; 2.76]).

CONCLUSIONS: We described low adipose tissue density and impaired adiponectin production to be associated with prior exposure to TA and/or ddI even years after treatment discontinuation and independently of adipose tissue area. These findings suggest that prior TA and ddI exposure may have long-lasting detrimental effects on adipose tissue function and, consequently, on cardiometabolic health in PLWH.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume19
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)708
ISSN1471-2334
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ID: 57776423