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Longitudinal associations of self-reported satisfaction with life and vitality with risk of mortality

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@article{171b96939d6244ff8c726bdf96087150,
title = "Longitudinal associations of self-reported satisfaction with life and vitality with risk of mortality",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The aims of the current study were to investigate the associations between two aspects of well-being - satisfaction with life and vitality - and all-cause mortality, and examine the impact of potential confounding factors on the associations.METHODS: Baseline satisfaction with life was assessed using the Satisfaction With Life Scale (n = 7058) and vitality was assessed using the Short-Form 36 vitality subscale (n = 6987). The study sample consisted of midlife participants from the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) study conducted from 2009 to 2011. Deaths (n = 312) in the study sample in the follow-up period (mean of 8.6 years) were assessed using Danish register data. The hazard ratios of all-cause mortality according to satisfaction with life and vitality scores adjusted for potential covariates were examined with proportional hazard regression.RESULTS: A one standard deviation increase on the SWLS and the SF-36 vitality scale was associated with a 39% (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.55-0.67) and 40% (HR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.54-0.66) decreased risk of mortality respectively, after adjustment for baseline sociodemographic factors. The associations remained significant after separate adjustment for lifestyle (SWLS: HR = 0.67, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.67), health (SWLS: HR = 0.65, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.64), depressive symptoms (SWLS: HR = 0.72, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.71) and social factors (SWLS: HR = 0.76, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.69).CONCLUSIONS: Satisfaction with life and vitality are of predictive value for mortality, independently of sociodemographics, lifestyle, health, depressive symptoms, and social factors.",
keywords = "Mortality, Satisfaction with life, Vitality, Well-being",
author = "Andersen, {Naja Kirstine} and Wimmelmann, {Cathrine Lawaetz} and Mortensen, {Erik Lykke} and Trine Flensborg-Madsen",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1016/j.jpsychores.2021.110529",
language = "English",
volume = "147",
journal = "Journal of Psychosomatic Research",
issn = "0022-3999",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Longitudinal associations of self-reported satisfaction with life and vitality with risk of mortality

AU - Andersen, Naja Kirstine

AU - Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz

AU - Mortensen, Erik Lykke

AU - Flensborg-Madsen, Trine

N1 - Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/8

Y1 - 2021/8

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aims of the current study were to investigate the associations between two aspects of well-being - satisfaction with life and vitality - and all-cause mortality, and examine the impact of potential confounding factors on the associations.METHODS: Baseline satisfaction with life was assessed using the Satisfaction With Life Scale (n = 7058) and vitality was assessed using the Short-Form 36 vitality subscale (n = 6987). The study sample consisted of midlife participants from the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) study conducted from 2009 to 2011. Deaths (n = 312) in the study sample in the follow-up period (mean of 8.6 years) were assessed using Danish register data. The hazard ratios of all-cause mortality according to satisfaction with life and vitality scores adjusted for potential covariates were examined with proportional hazard regression.RESULTS: A one standard deviation increase on the SWLS and the SF-36 vitality scale was associated with a 39% (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.55-0.67) and 40% (HR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.54-0.66) decreased risk of mortality respectively, after adjustment for baseline sociodemographic factors. The associations remained significant after separate adjustment for lifestyle (SWLS: HR = 0.67, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.67), health (SWLS: HR = 0.65, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.64), depressive symptoms (SWLS: HR = 0.72, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.71) and social factors (SWLS: HR = 0.76, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.69).CONCLUSIONS: Satisfaction with life and vitality are of predictive value for mortality, independently of sociodemographics, lifestyle, health, depressive symptoms, and social factors.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The aims of the current study were to investigate the associations between two aspects of well-being - satisfaction with life and vitality - and all-cause mortality, and examine the impact of potential confounding factors on the associations.METHODS: Baseline satisfaction with life was assessed using the Satisfaction With Life Scale (n = 7058) and vitality was assessed using the Short-Form 36 vitality subscale (n = 6987). The study sample consisted of midlife participants from the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) study conducted from 2009 to 2011. Deaths (n = 312) in the study sample in the follow-up period (mean of 8.6 years) were assessed using Danish register data. The hazard ratios of all-cause mortality according to satisfaction with life and vitality scores adjusted for potential covariates were examined with proportional hazard regression.RESULTS: A one standard deviation increase on the SWLS and the SF-36 vitality scale was associated with a 39% (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.55-0.67) and 40% (HR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.54-0.66) decreased risk of mortality respectively, after adjustment for baseline sociodemographic factors. The associations remained significant after separate adjustment for lifestyle (SWLS: HR = 0.67, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.67), health (SWLS: HR = 0.65, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.64), depressive symptoms (SWLS: HR = 0.72, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.71) and social factors (SWLS: HR = 0.76, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.69).CONCLUSIONS: Satisfaction with life and vitality are of predictive value for mortality, independently of sociodemographics, lifestyle, health, depressive symptoms, and social factors.

KW - Mortality

KW - Satisfaction with life

KW - Vitality

KW - Well-being

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85107148943&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2021.110529

DO - 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2021.110529

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34087502

VL - 147

JO - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

JF - Journal of Psychosomatic Research

SN - 0022-3999

M1 - 110529

ER -

ID: 66135510