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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Longitudinal associations of self-reported satisfaction with life and vitality with risk of mortality

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OBJECTIVE: The aims of the current study were to investigate the associations between two aspects of well-being - satisfaction with life and vitality - and all-cause mortality, and examine the impact of potential confounding factors on the associations.

METHODS: Baseline satisfaction with life was assessed using the Satisfaction With Life Scale (n = 7058) and vitality was assessed using the Short-Form 36 vitality subscale (n = 6987). The study sample consisted of midlife participants from the Copenhagen Aging and Midlife Biobank (CAMB) study conducted from 2009 to 2011. Deaths (n = 312) in the study sample in the follow-up period (mean of 8.6 years) were assessed using Danish register data. The hazard ratios of all-cause mortality according to satisfaction with life and vitality scores adjusted for potential covariates were examined with proportional hazard regression.

RESULTS: A one standard deviation increase on the SWLS and the SF-36 vitality scale was associated with a 39% (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.55-0.67) and 40% (HR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.54-0.66) decreased risk of mortality respectively, after adjustment for baseline sociodemographic factors. The associations remained significant after separate adjustment for lifestyle (SWLS: HR = 0.67, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.67), health (SWLS: HR = 0.65, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.64), depressive symptoms (SWLS: HR = 0.72, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.71) and social factors (SWLS: HR = 0.76, SF-36 vitality: HR = 0.69).

CONCLUSIONS: Satisfaction with life and vitality are of predictive value for mortality, independently of sociodemographics, lifestyle, health, depressive symptoms, and social factors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110529
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume147
ISSN0022-3999
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

    Research areas

  • Mortality, Satisfaction with life, Vitality, Well-being

ID: 66135510