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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Longer distance to specialized treatment centers does not adversely affect treatment intensity or outcomes in adult acute myeloid leukemia patients. A Danish national population-based cohort study

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Background: Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is widely centralized. Longer distances to a specialized treatment center may affect patients' access to curative-intended treatment. Especially during outpatient treatment, distance may also affect survival.

Methods and patients: The authors conducted a national population-based cohort study including all AML patients diagnosed in Denmark between 2000 and 2014. We investigated effects of distance (<10 kilometers [km; reference], 10-25, 25-50, 50-100, >100) to the nearest specialized treatment facility on the probability of receiving intensive chemotherapy, HSCT, and achieving a complete remission (CR) using logistic regression analysis (odds ratios; ORs). For overall survival, we used Cox proportional hazards regression (hazard ratios [HRs]) and adjusted (a) for relevant baseline characteristics.

Results: Of 2,992 patients (median age=68.5 years), 53% received intensive chemotherapy and 12% received low-dose chemotherapy outpatient regimens. The median distance to a specialized treatment center was 40 km (interquartile range=10-77 km). No impact of distance to specialized treatment centers was seen on the probability of receiving intensive chemotherapy (10-25 km, aOR=1.1 (CI=0.7-1.7), 25-50 km, aOR=1.1 (CI=0.7-1.7), 50-100 km, aOR=1.3 (CI=0.9-1.9), and >100 km, aOR=1.4 [CI=0.9-2.2]). Overall survival in patients regardless of therapy (<10 km, aOR=1.0 vs >100 km, aOR=1.0 [CI=0.9-1.2]), in intensive therapy patients, or in patients' choice of post-remission was not affected by distance to specialized treatment center. Distance to a transplant center also did not affect the probability of HSCT or survival post-HSCT.

Conclusion: In Denmark, distance to a specialized treatment facility offering remission-induction chemotherapy and HSCT does not negatively affect access to curative-indented therapy, treatment-response, or survival in AML patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Epidemiology
Volume11
Pages (from-to)769-780
Number of pages12
ISSN1179-1349
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

ID: 59139965