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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre including abnormal dental development

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  1. Ectopic eruption of the second premolar: an analysis of four different treatment approaches

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    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Primary failure of eruption of teeth in two siblings with a novel mutation in the PTH1R gene

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II- genotype and phenotype analyses in three Danish families

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BACKGROUND: Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre (SCS) is a rare skin condition, where dense collagen is deposited in a localised groove of the head and neck area resembling the stroke of a sabre. The SCS may involve the oral cavity, but the severity and relation to this skin abnormality is unknown. A paediatric dentist may be the first medical person to identify SCS by its involvement in dentition. It is assumed that the malformation of a dentition could be associated with the severity of the skin deviation.

CASE REPORT: A 6-year and 10-month-old Turkish girl with a history of SCS was referred for dental diagnostics and treatment. The SCS skin lesion affected the left side of her hairline over the forehead and nose, involving the left orbit proceeding towards the left oral region. Dental clinical/radiographic examination revealed malformed left maxillary incisors with short roots and lack of eruption.

FOLLOW-UP: The patient has been regularly controlled and treated since she was first diagnosed. A surgical and orthodontic treatment was performed to ensure optimal occlusion, space and alveolar bone development. The present age of the patient is 14 years and 10 months.

CONCLUSION: This case demonstrated a patient with a left-sided skin defect (SCS) and a left-sided local malformation in her dentition. It is possible that there is a developmental connection between these two left-sided defects, both with an ectodermal origin.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean archives of paediatric dentistry
Volume16
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)227-231
ISSN1818-6300
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ID: 45081406