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Less known aspects of central hypothyroidism: Part 2 - Congenital etiologies

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@article{925ad4f8b0294ba8885b4c35eb4d6caa,
title = "Less known aspects of central hypothyroidism: Part 2 - Congenital etiologies",
abstract = "Central hypothyroidism (CH) occurs approximately in 1:50,000, and therefore is expected to be one thousand times rarer compared with primary hypothyroidism. Despite its rarity in the general population, it is much more common in certain disorders, in which it is frequently associated with other pituitary hormone deficiencies. The aim of this paper is to provide an updated review on the frequency of congenital CH, which is <1:50,000, and on its etiology, disregarding CH caused by other genetic defects, such as mutations of transcription factors involved in pituitary organogenesis or mutations of the genes encoding TRH or TRH receptor.",
author = "Salvatore Benvenga and Marianne Klose and Roberto Vita and Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcte.2018.09.004",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "5--11",
journal = "Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology",
issn = "2214-6237",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Less known aspects of central hypothyroidism

T2 - Part 2 - Congenital etiologies

AU - Benvenga, Salvatore

AU - Klose, Marianne

AU - Vita, Roberto

AU - Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - Central hypothyroidism (CH) occurs approximately in 1:50,000, and therefore is expected to be one thousand times rarer compared with primary hypothyroidism. Despite its rarity in the general population, it is much more common in certain disorders, in which it is frequently associated with other pituitary hormone deficiencies. The aim of this paper is to provide an updated review on the frequency of congenital CH, which is <1:50,000, and on its etiology, disregarding CH caused by other genetic defects, such as mutations of transcription factors involved in pituitary organogenesis or mutations of the genes encoding TRH or TRH receptor.

AB - Central hypothyroidism (CH) occurs approximately in 1:50,000, and therefore is expected to be one thousand times rarer compared with primary hypothyroidism. Despite its rarity in the general population, it is much more common in certain disorders, in which it is frequently associated with other pituitary hormone deficiencies. The aim of this paper is to provide an updated review on the frequency of congenital CH, which is <1:50,000, and on its etiology, disregarding CH caused by other genetic defects, such as mutations of transcription factors involved in pituitary organogenesis or mutations of the genes encoding TRH or TRH receptor.

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcte.2018.09.004

DO - 10.1016/j.jcte.2018.09.004

M3 - Review

VL - 14

SP - 5

EP - 11

JO - Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology

JF - Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology

SN - 2214-6237

ER -

ID: 56291085