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Laser speckle contrast imaging and quantitative fluorescence angiography for perfusion assessment

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@article{89e88cc21f484446a5b6d948524adc65,
title = "Laser speckle contrast imaging and quantitative fluorescence angiography for perfusion assessment",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography (ICG-FA) is an established technique for assessment of intestinal perfusion during gastrointestinal surgery, whereas quantitative ICG-FA (q-ICG) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) are relatively unproven. The study aimed to investigate whether the techniques could be applied interchangeably for perfusion assessment.METHODS: Nineteen pigs underwent laparotomy, two minor resections of the small bowel, and anastomoses. Additionally, seven pigs had parts of their stomach and small intestine de-vascularized. Data was also collected from an in vivo model (inferior caval vein measurements in two additional pigs) and an ex vivo flow model, allowing for standardization of experimental flow, distance, and angulation. Q-ICG and LSCI were performed, so that regions of interest were matched between the two modalities in the analyses, ensuring coverage of the same tissue.RESULTS: The overall correlation of q-ICG and LSCI evaluated in the porcine model was modest (rho = 0.45, p < 0.001), but high in tissue with low perfusion (rho = 0.74, p < 0.001). Flux values obtained by LSCI from the ex vivo flow model revealed a decreasing flux with linearly increasing distance as well as angulation to the model. The Q-ICG perfusion values obtained varied slightly with increasing distance as well as angulation to the model.CONCLUSIONS: Q-ICG and LSCI cannot be used interchangeably but may supplement each other. LSCI is profoundly affected by angulation and distance. In comparison, q-ICG is minimally affected by changing experimental conditions and is more readily applicable in minimally invasive surgery.",
author = "R{\o}nn, {Jonas Hedelund} and Nikolaj Nerup and Strandby, {Rune Broni} and Svendsen, {Morten Bo S{\o}ndergaard} and Rikard Ambrus and Svendsen, {Lars Bo} and Achiam, {Michael Patrick}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1007/s00423-019-01789-8",
language = "English",
journal = "Langenbecks Archives of Surgery",
issn = "1435-2443",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Laser speckle contrast imaging and quantitative fluorescence angiography for perfusion assessment

AU - Rønn, Jonas Hedelund

AU - Nerup, Nikolaj

AU - Strandby, Rune Broni

AU - Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard

AU - Ambrus, Rikard

AU - Svendsen, Lars Bo

AU - Achiam, Michael Patrick

PY - 2019/5/4

Y1 - 2019/5/4

N2 - PURPOSE: Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography (ICG-FA) is an established technique for assessment of intestinal perfusion during gastrointestinal surgery, whereas quantitative ICG-FA (q-ICG) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) are relatively unproven. The study aimed to investigate whether the techniques could be applied interchangeably for perfusion assessment.METHODS: Nineteen pigs underwent laparotomy, two minor resections of the small bowel, and anastomoses. Additionally, seven pigs had parts of their stomach and small intestine de-vascularized. Data was also collected from an in vivo model (inferior caval vein measurements in two additional pigs) and an ex vivo flow model, allowing for standardization of experimental flow, distance, and angulation. Q-ICG and LSCI were performed, so that regions of interest were matched between the two modalities in the analyses, ensuring coverage of the same tissue.RESULTS: The overall correlation of q-ICG and LSCI evaluated in the porcine model was modest (rho = 0.45, p < 0.001), but high in tissue with low perfusion (rho = 0.74, p < 0.001). Flux values obtained by LSCI from the ex vivo flow model revealed a decreasing flux with linearly increasing distance as well as angulation to the model. The Q-ICG perfusion values obtained varied slightly with increasing distance as well as angulation to the model.CONCLUSIONS: Q-ICG and LSCI cannot be used interchangeably but may supplement each other. LSCI is profoundly affected by angulation and distance. In comparison, q-ICG is minimally affected by changing experimental conditions and is more readily applicable in minimally invasive surgery.

AB - PURPOSE: Indocyanine green fluorescence angiography (ICG-FA) is an established technique for assessment of intestinal perfusion during gastrointestinal surgery, whereas quantitative ICG-FA (q-ICG) and laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) are relatively unproven. The study aimed to investigate whether the techniques could be applied interchangeably for perfusion assessment.METHODS: Nineteen pigs underwent laparotomy, two minor resections of the small bowel, and anastomoses. Additionally, seven pigs had parts of their stomach and small intestine de-vascularized. Data was also collected from an in vivo model (inferior caval vein measurements in two additional pigs) and an ex vivo flow model, allowing for standardization of experimental flow, distance, and angulation. Q-ICG and LSCI were performed, so that regions of interest were matched between the two modalities in the analyses, ensuring coverage of the same tissue.RESULTS: The overall correlation of q-ICG and LSCI evaluated in the porcine model was modest (rho = 0.45, p < 0.001), but high in tissue with low perfusion (rho = 0.74, p < 0.001). Flux values obtained by LSCI from the ex vivo flow model revealed a decreasing flux with linearly increasing distance as well as angulation to the model. The Q-ICG perfusion values obtained varied slightly with increasing distance as well as angulation to the model.CONCLUSIONS: Q-ICG and LSCI cannot be used interchangeably but may supplement each other. LSCI is profoundly affected by angulation and distance. In comparison, q-ICG is minimally affected by changing experimental conditions and is more readily applicable in minimally invasive surgery.

U2 - 10.1007/s00423-019-01789-8

DO - 10.1007/s00423-019-01789-8

M3 - Journal article

JO - Langenbecks Archives of Surgery

JF - Langenbecks Archives of Surgery

SN - 1435-2443

ER -

ID: 57161015