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Ketamine for rapid sequence intubation in adult trauma patients: A retrospective observational study

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BACKGROUND: In the trauma population, ketamine is commonly used during rapid sequence induction. However, as ketamine has been associated with important side effects, this study sought to compare in-hospital mortality in trauma patients after induction with ketamine versus other induction agents.

METHODS: We retrospectively identified adult trauma patients intubated in the pre-hospital phase or initially in the trauma bay at two urban level-1 trauma centers during a 2-year period using local trauma registries and medical records. In-hospital mortality was compared for patients intubated with ketamine versus other agents using logistic regression with adjustment for age, gender, Injury Severity Score (ISS), systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 90 mm Hg, and pre-hospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score.

RESULTS: A total of 343 trauma patients were included with a median ISS of 25 [17-34]. The most frequently used induction agents were ketamine (36%) and propofol (36%) followed by etomidate (9%) and midazolam (5%). There was no difference in ISS or the presence of SBP <90 mm Hg according to the agent of choice, but the pre-hospital GCS score was higher for patients intubated with ketamine (median 8 vs 5, P = .001). The mortality for patients intubated with ketamine was 18% vs 27% for patients intubated with other agents (P = .14). This remained statistically insignificant in the multivariable logistic regression analysis (odds ratio 0.68 [0.33-1.41], P = .30).

CONCLUSIONS: We found no statistically significant difference in mortality among patients intubated in the initial phase post-trauma with the use of ketamine compared with other agents (propofol, etomidate, or midazolam).

Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
Volume64
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)1234-1242
Number of pages9
ISSN0001-5172
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2020

Bibliographical note

© 2020 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    Research areas

  • intubation, ketamine, rapid sequence induction, trauma

ID: 60074472