Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

“It is two worlds” cross-sectoral nurse collaboration related to care transitions: A qualitative study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{21c2031bedd94963941c1d445cf649a0,
title = "“It is two worlds” cross-sectoral nurse collaboration related to care transitions: A qualitative study",
abstract = "Aims and objectives: To explore how the hospital and home care nurses talk about and experience cross-sectoral collaboration related to the transitional care of frail older patients. Background: Effective communication and collaboration between nurses involved in care transition are crucial for a safe patient handover. Organisational systems to support cross-sectoral collaboration have been developed but do not always promote the intended dialogue and precise and useful exchange of information. Other factors may also be of importance to an effective and constructive cross-sectoral nurse collaboration. Design: A qualitative design using thematic analysis. Methods: Data were extracted from 24 focus group interviews conducted with registered nurses from eight hospital wards and six municipalities and a total of 165 hr of observations conducted in three hospital wards and three municipalities. The study was reported according to the COREQ guidelines. Results: The perception of nursing and care differed across sectors. The nurses expressed having shared goals for the patients—however, these goals derived from different values, the perception of nursing and approach to the patients. The lack of knowledge of each other's working conditions created assumptions and preconceptions, which affected communication and collaboration related to planning and executing care transition negatively. Conclusions: The nurses perceived the hospital and home care as{"} two worlds{"}. The collaboration between the nurses was characterised by insufficient communication and preconceptions rather than concrete knowledge and different cultures and professional identities. It can be questioned whether cross-sectoral collaboration between nurses should be characterised as interprofessional rather than intraprofessional collaboration as the features of the nurses' collaboration. Relevance to clinical practice: Organisational and political systems should recognise that nurses in different sectors are taking care of various aspects of nursing when planning on policies to support cross-sectoral collaboration. More possibilities for nurses across sectors to meet should be made available.",
keywords = "collaboration, communication, cultural issues, primary/secondary care interface, qualitative study, transitional care",
author = "Petersen, {Helle Vendel} and Signe Foged and Vibeke N{\o}rholm",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1111/jocn.14805",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "1999--2008",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Nursing",
issn = "0962-1067",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "9-10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - “It is two worlds” cross-sectoral nurse collaboration related to care transitions

T2 - A qualitative study

AU - Petersen, Helle Vendel

AU - Foged, Signe

AU - Nørholm, Vibeke

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/5

Y1 - 2019/5

N2 - Aims and objectives: To explore how the hospital and home care nurses talk about and experience cross-sectoral collaboration related to the transitional care of frail older patients. Background: Effective communication and collaboration between nurses involved in care transition are crucial for a safe patient handover. Organisational systems to support cross-sectoral collaboration have been developed but do not always promote the intended dialogue and precise and useful exchange of information. Other factors may also be of importance to an effective and constructive cross-sectoral nurse collaboration. Design: A qualitative design using thematic analysis. Methods: Data were extracted from 24 focus group interviews conducted with registered nurses from eight hospital wards and six municipalities and a total of 165 hr of observations conducted in three hospital wards and three municipalities. The study was reported according to the COREQ guidelines. Results: The perception of nursing and care differed across sectors. The nurses expressed having shared goals for the patients—however, these goals derived from different values, the perception of nursing and approach to the patients. The lack of knowledge of each other's working conditions created assumptions and preconceptions, which affected communication and collaboration related to planning and executing care transition negatively. Conclusions: The nurses perceived the hospital and home care as" two worlds". The collaboration between the nurses was characterised by insufficient communication and preconceptions rather than concrete knowledge and different cultures and professional identities. It can be questioned whether cross-sectoral collaboration between nurses should be characterised as interprofessional rather than intraprofessional collaboration as the features of the nurses' collaboration. Relevance to clinical practice: Organisational and political systems should recognise that nurses in different sectors are taking care of various aspects of nursing when planning on policies to support cross-sectoral collaboration. More possibilities for nurses across sectors to meet should be made available.

AB - Aims and objectives: To explore how the hospital and home care nurses talk about and experience cross-sectoral collaboration related to the transitional care of frail older patients. Background: Effective communication and collaboration between nurses involved in care transition are crucial for a safe patient handover. Organisational systems to support cross-sectoral collaboration have been developed but do not always promote the intended dialogue and precise and useful exchange of information. Other factors may also be of importance to an effective and constructive cross-sectoral nurse collaboration. Design: A qualitative design using thematic analysis. Methods: Data were extracted from 24 focus group interviews conducted with registered nurses from eight hospital wards and six municipalities and a total of 165 hr of observations conducted in three hospital wards and three municipalities. The study was reported according to the COREQ guidelines. Results: The perception of nursing and care differed across sectors. The nurses expressed having shared goals for the patients—however, these goals derived from different values, the perception of nursing and approach to the patients. The lack of knowledge of each other's working conditions created assumptions and preconceptions, which affected communication and collaboration related to planning and executing care transition negatively. Conclusions: The nurses perceived the hospital and home care as" two worlds". The collaboration between the nurses was characterised by insufficient communication and preconceptions rather than concrete knowledge and different cultures and professional identities. It can be questioned whether cross-sectoral collaboration between nurses should be characterised as interprofessional rather than intraprofessional collaboration as the features of the nurses' collaboration. Relevance to clinical practice: Organisational and political systems should recognise that nurses in different sectors are taking care of various aspects of nursing when planning on policies to support cross-sectoral collaboration. More possibilities for nurses across sectors to meet should be made available.

KW - collaboration

KW - communication

KW - cultural issues

KW - primary/secondary care interface

KW - qualitative study

KW - transitional care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061779164&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jocn.14805

DO - 10.1111/jocn.14805

M3 - Journal article

VL - 28

SP - 1999

EP - 2008

JO - Journal of Clinical Nursing

JF - Journal of Clinical Nursing

SN - 0962-1067

IS - 9-10

ER -

ID: 56412745