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Ischaemic vascular disease and long-term mortality in emergency abdominal surgical patients: A population-based cohort study

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@article{70333133d7d0498f81d811b24f1d39d9,
title = "Ischaemic vascular disease and long-term mortality in emergency abdominal surgical patients: A population-based cohort study",
abstract = "Background: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a high mortality, as patients are often frail with significant comorbidity. We aimed to evaluate the association between co-existing ischaemic vascular disease (IVD) and long-term mortality in patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery. Methods: We included adult emergency abdominal surgical patients operated on 13 Danish hospitals between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010. Appendectomies were excluded. Data were retrieved from the National Patient Registry (NPR) and the Danish Anaesthesia Database. Preoperative IVD status was retrieved from NPR. We used crude and adjusted Cox regression analysis. The primary outcome was mortality within eight years. The secondary outcome was mortality within 30 days. Results: We included 4864 patients, of which 2584 (53.7%) died within 8 years. Some 20.9% (1019/4864) had preoperative IVD. The adjusted association between preoperative IVD and mortality within 8 years was hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.20; P =.045). At 30 days, this association was HR 0.97 (95% CI, 0.84-1.13). Conclusion: In adult major emergency abdominal surgical patients, preoperative IVD was prevalent and associated with a 10% relative increase in long-term mortality, but not in short-term mortality.",
author = "Tvarn{\o}, {Casper D.} and Nicolai Lohse and M{\o}ller, {Morten H.} and M{\o}ller, {Ann M.} and Morten Vester-Andersen",
note = "Funding Information: This project was funded by the Department of Anaesthesiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev‐Gentofte, Herlev, Denmark. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1111/aas.13846",
language = "English",
journal = "Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica",
issn = "0001-5172",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Munksgaard",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ischaemic vascular disease and long-term mortality in emergency abdominal surgical patients

T2 - A population-based cohort study

AU - Tvarnø, Casper D.

AU - Lohse, Nicolai

AU - Møller, Morten H.

AU - Møller, Ann M.

AU - Vester-Andersen, Morten

N1 - Funding Information: This project was funded by the Department of Anaesthesiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev‐Gentofte, Herlev, Denmark. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/5/8

Y1 - 2021/5/8

N2 - Background: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a high mortality, as patients are often frail with significant comorbidity. We aimed to evaluate the association between co-existing ischaemic vascular disease (IVD) and long-term mortality in patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery. Methods: We included adult emergency abdominal surgical patients operated on 13 Danish hospitals between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010. Appendectomies were excluded. Data were retrieved from the National Patient Registry (NPR) and the Danish Anaesthesia Database. Preoperative IVD status was retrieved from NPR. We used crude and adjusted Cox regression analysis. The primary outcome was mortality within eight years. The secondary outcome was mortality within 30 days. Results: We included 4864 patients, of which 2584 (53.7%) died within 8 years. Some 20.9% (1019/4864) had preoperative IVD. The adjusted association between preoperative IVD and mortality within 8 years was hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.20; P =.045). At 30 days, this association was HR 0.97 (95% CI, 0.84-1.13). Conclusion: In adult major emergency abdominal surgical patients, preoperative IVD was prevalent and associated with a 10% relative increase in long-term mortality, but not in short-term mortality.

AB - Background: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a high mortality, as patients are often frail with significant comorbidity. We aimed to evaluate the association between co-existing ischaemic vascular disease (IVD) and long-term mortality in patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery. Methods: We included adult emergency abdominal surgical patients operated on 13 Danish hospitals between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2010. Appendectomies were excluded. Data were retrieved from the National Patient Registry (NPR) and the Danish Anaesthesia Database. Preoperative IVD status was retrieved from NPR. We used crude and adjusted Cox regression analysis. The primary outcome was mortality within eight years. The secondary outcome was mortality within 30 days. Results: We included 4864 patients, of which 2584 (53.7%) died within 8 years. Some 20.9% (1019/4864) had preoperative IVD. The adjusted association between preoperative IVD and mortality within 8 years was hazard ratio (HR) 1.10 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-1.20; P =.045). At 30 days, this association was HR 0.97 (95% CI, 0.84-1.13). Conclusion: In adult major emergency abdominal surgical patients, preoperative IVD was prevalent and associated with a 10% relative increase in long-term mortality, but not in short-term mortality.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85106235434&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/aas.13846

DO - 10.1111/aas.13846

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33964017

AN - SCOPUS:85106235434

JO - Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica

JF - Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica

SN - 0001-5172

ER -

ID: 66111699