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Is conscious perception gradual or dichotomous? A comparison of report methodologies during a visual task.

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  1. The neurophenomenology of early psychosis: An integrative empirical study

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  2. Thought insertion and disturbed for-me-ness (minimal selfhood) in schizophrenia

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  3. Mysticism and schizophrenia: A phenomenological exploration of the structure of consciousness in the schizophrenia spectrum disorders

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  4. The "minimal self" in psychopathology: re-examining the self-disorders in the schizophrenia spectrum

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  1. Aberrant neural signatures of decision-making: Pathological gamblers display cortico-striatal hypersensitivity to extreme gambles

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  2. The Neural Bases of Framing Effects in Social Dilemmas

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  3. Amygdala signals subjective appetitiveness and aversiveness of mixed gambles

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  4. Empathy as a neuropsychological heuristic in social decision-making

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In a recent article, [Sergent, C. & Dehaene, S. (2004). Is consciousness a gradual phenomenon? Evidence for an all-or-none bifurcation during the attentional blink, Psychological Science, 15(11), 720-729] claim to give experimental support to the thesis that there is a clear transition between conscious and unconscious perception. This idea is opposed to theoretical arguments that we should think of conscious perception as a continuum of clarity, with e.g., fringe conscious states [Mangan, B. (2001). Sensation's ghost-the non-sensory "fringe" of consciousness, Psyche, 7, 18]. In the experimental study described in this article, we find support for this opposite notion that we should have a parsimonious account of conscious perception. Our reported finding relates to the hypothesis that there is more than one perceptual threshold [Merikle, P.M., Smilek, D. & Eastwood, J.D. (2001). Perception without awareness: perspectives from cognitive psychology, Cognition, 79, 115-134], but goes further to argue that there are different "levels" of conscious perception
Original languageEnglish
JournalConscious Cogn
Volume15
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)700-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

ID: 32547337