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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Involvement of epigenetic modifiers in the pathogenesis of testicular dysgenesis and germ cell cancer

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  1. Regulation of meiotic entry and gonadal sex differentiation in the human: normal and disrupted signaling

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  2. Medium-throughput Screening Assays for Assessment of Effects on Ca2+-Signaling and Acrosome Reaction in Human Sperm

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  3. Identification of circulating small non-coding RNAs in relation to male subfertility and reproductive hormones

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  4. Decrease in semen quality and Leydig cell function in infertile men: a longitudinal study

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  5. Expression of the O-Glycosylation Enzyme GalNAc-T3 in the Equatorial Segment Correlates with the Quality of Spermatozoa

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Testicular germ cell cancer manifests mainly in young adults as a seminoma or non-seminoma. The solid tumors are preceded by the presence of a non-invasive precursor cell, the carcinoma in situ cell (CIS), which shows great similarity to fetal germ cells. It is therefore hypothesized that the CIS cell is a fetal germ cell that has been arrested during development due to testicular dysgenesis. CIS cells retain a fetal and open chromatin structure, and recently several epigenetic modifiers have been suggested to be involved in testicular dysgenesis in mice. We here review the possible involvement of epigenetic modifiers with a focus on jumonji C enzymes in the development of testicular dysgenesis and germ cell cancer in men.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBiomolecular Concepts
Volume6
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)219-27
ISSN1868-5021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jun 2015

ID: 45455513