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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Intracochlear Vestibular Schwannoma Presenting with Mixed Hearing Loss

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  1. Vestibular Function in Pendred Syndrome: Intact High Frequency VOR and Saccular Hypersensitivity

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  2. Natural History of Growing Sporadic Vestibular Schwannomas During Observation: An International Multi-Institutional Study

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  3. Long-Term Vestibular Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Recipients

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As for other vestibular schwannomas, intralabyrinthine schwannomas commonly cause a sensorineural hearing loss, contrary to more lateral ear pathology that can cause conductive or mixed hearing loss. This case report features a patient that presented with a mixed and thus partly pseudo-conductive hearing loss due to an intracochlear schwannoma, a finding that is very rare. As a result, the patient was initially misdiagnosed as having otosclerosis and a stapedotomy was performed, without hearing improvement. We discuss the clinical implications of this atypical presentation, which illustrates the importance of performing supplementary audiological testing (e.g., the Gellé test), and the importance of considering vestibular system testing when otosclerosis is suspected. In addition, the importance of imaging and considering differential diagnoses in cases of conductive hearing loss is stressed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of International Advanced Otology
Volume17
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)265-268
Number of pages4
ISSN1308-7649
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

    Research areas

  • Conductive hearing loss, Hearing loss, Hearing rehabilitation, Magnetic resonance imaging, Surgery, Vestibulopathy

ID: 66480570