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Interstitial cells of Cajal as targets for pharmacological intervention in gastrointestinal motor disorders

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  1. Identifying New Antimigraine Targets: Lessons from Molecular Biology

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  2. High progesterone levels during the luteal phase related to the use of an aromatase inhibitor in breast cancer patients

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  3. Novel Targeted Therapies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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  4. Heteromeric α7β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Brain

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  5. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

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  1. Symptoms and biomarkers associated with undiagnosed celiac seropositivity

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  2. Biochemical Diagnosis of Bile Acid Diarrhea: Prospective Comparison With the 75Seleno-Taurohomocholic Acid Test

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  3. Long-term Consequences of Undiagnosed Celiac Seropositivity

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  4. The association of celiac disease and allergic disease in a general adult population

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Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) have recently been identified as the pacemaker cells for contractile activity of the gastrointestinal tract. These cells generate the electrical 'slow-wave' activity that determines the characteristic frequency of phasic contractions of the stomach, intestine and colon. Slow waves also determine the direction and velocity of propagation of peristaltic activity, in concert with the enteric nervous system. Characterization of receptors and ion channels in the ICC membrane is under way, and manipulation of slow-wave activity markedly alters movement of contents through the gut organs. Here Jan Huizinga, Lars Thuneberg, Jean-Marie Vanderwinden and Jüri Rumessen, suggest that, as ICCs are unique to the gut, they might be ideal targets for pharmacological intervention in gastrointestinal motility disorders, which are very common and costly.
Original languageEnglish
JournalTrends in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume18
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)393-403
Number of pages11
ISSN0165-6147
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1997

    Research areas

  • Animals, Biological Clocks, Digestive System, Digestive System Physiological Phenomena, Gastrointestinal Agents, Gastrointestinal Diseases, Gastrointestinal Motility, Humans

ID: 39690356