Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Interpreter-mediated psychotherapy with trauma-affected refugees – A retrospective cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{a686f338999f4b4c91f03ba5aac6ba5c,
title = "Interpreter-mediated psychotherapy with trauma-affected refugees – A retrospective cohort study",
abstract = "The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to examine if interpreter-mediated psychotherapy with trauma-affected refugees affects treatment outcome. The clinical sample consisted of 825 patients who, as part of treatment, were offered 16 sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy. The cohort was allocated to two subsamples based on whether interpreters were used in psychotherapy or not and the treatment outcome for the two subsamples was compared. The primary outcome measure was severity of PTSD-symptoms (Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ)) and secondary outcome measures were depression and anxiety symptoms (Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25), Hamilton Depression and Anxiety rating scales (HAM-D, HAM-A)), somatisation (somatisation items of SCL-90 (SI-SCL-90)), quality of life (WHO-5-Well-being Index (WHO-5)) and functioning (Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF-F, GAF-S)). Compared to no use of interpreter, the use of interpreter in psychotherapy was associated with less improvement during treatment on the primary outcome measure HTQ and the secondary outcome measures HSCL-25, SI-SCL-90, SDS, WHO-5, HAM-A, but not on GAF-S, GAF-F and HAM-D. Based on the primary outcome measure HTQ and the majority of the secondary ratings the subsample in interpreter-mediated psychotherapy had less improvement in their mental health status compared to the subsample without interpreter.",
keywords = "Health Sciences",
author = "Rikke Sander and Henriette Laugesen and Signe Skammeritz and Mortensen, {Erik Lykke} and Jessica Carlsson",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.psychres.2018.12.058",
language = "English",
volume = "271",
pages = "684--692",
journal = "Psychiatry Research",
issn = "0165-1781",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interpreter-mediated psychotherapy with trauma-affected refugees – A retrospective cohort study

AU - Sander, Rikke

AU - Laugesen, Henriette

AU - Skammeritz, Signe

AU - Mortensen, Erik Lykke

AU - Carlsson, Jessica

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to examine if interpreter-mediated psychotherapy with trauma-affected refugees affects treatment outcome. The clinical sample consisted of 825 patients who, as part of treatment, were offered 16 sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy. The cohort was allocated to two subsamples based on whether interpreters were used in psychotherapy or not and the treatment outcome for the two subsamples was compared. The primary outcome measure was severity of PTSD-symptoms (Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ)) and secondary outcome measures were depression and anxiety symptoms (Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25), Hamilton Depression and Anxiety rating scales (HAM-D, HAM-A)), somatisation (somatisation items of SCL-90 (SI-SCL-90)), quality of life (WHO-5-Well-being Index (WHO-5)) and functioning (Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF-F, GAF-S)). Compared to no use of interpreter, the use of interpreter in psychotherapy was associated with less improvement during treatment on the primary outcome measure HTQ and the secondary outcome measures HSCL-25, SI-SCL-90, SDS, WHO-5, HAM-A, but not on GAF-S, GAF-F and HAM-D. Based on the primary outcome measure HTQ and the majority of the secondary ratings the subsample in interpreter-mediated psychotherapy had less improvement in their mental health status compared to the subsample without interpreter.

AB - The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to examine if interpreter-mediated psychotherapy with trauma-affected refugees affects treatment outcome. The clinical sample consisted of 825 patients who, as part of treatment, were offered 16 sessions of cognitive behavioural therapy. The cohort was allocated to two subsamples based on whether interpreters were used in psychotherapy or not and the treatment outcome for the two subsamples was compared. The primary outcome measure was severity of PTSD-symptoms (Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ)) and secondary outcome measures were depression and anxiety symptoms (Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25), Hamilton Depression and Anxiety rating scales (HAM-D, HAM-A)), somatisation (somatisation items of SCL-90 (SI-SCL-90)), quality of life (WHO-5-Well-being Index (WHO-5)) and functioning (Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF-F, GAF-S)). Compared to no use of interpreter, the use of interpreter in psychotherapy was associated with less improvement during treatment on the primary outcome measure HTQ and the secondary outcome measures HSCL-25, SI-SCL-90, SDS, WHO-5, HAM-A, but not on GAF-S, GAF-F and HAM-D. Based on the primary outcome measure HTQ and the majority of the secondary ratings the subsample in interpreter-mediated psychotherapy had less improvement in their mental health status compared to the subsample without interpreter.

KW - Health Sciences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058412097&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.12.058

DO - 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.12.058

M3 - Journal article

VL - 271

SP - 684

EP - 692

JO - Psychiatry Research

JF - Psychiatry Research

SN - 0165-1781

ER -

ID: 56510906