Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Intermittent vacuum treatment with VacuMed does not improve peripheral artery disease or walking capacity in patients with intermittent claudication

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Validation of suPAR turbidimetric assay on Cobas® (c502 and c702) and comparison to suPAR ELISA

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Transcerebral exchange kinetics of large neutral amino acids during acute inspiratory hypoxia in humans

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Platelet function in lung cancer patients undergoing lobectomy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Resting heart rate and mortality in the very old

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. [99mTc]-labelled interleukin-8 as a diagnostic tool compared to [18F]FDG and CT in an experimental porcine osteomyelitis model

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Inspiratory muscle strength and walking capacity in patients with COPD

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

To assess distal blood pressures (BPs) in ankle and toe, walking capacity, intermittent claudication symptoms, physical activity and self-rated health after intermittent vacuum treatment (IVT) for peripheral artery disease (PAD). Forty-eight patients with PAD were randomised to either a control (C)-group with lifestyle changes or lifestyle changes in combination with VacuMed® treatment thrice weekly for 6 weeks. Ankle and toe BPs were measured before, after 6 weeks of intervention and after 6 weeks follow-up. Walking capacity, intermittent claudication symptoms, physical activity and self-rated health (Likert scale) were also assessed. The ankle to brachial index (ABI) and BPs in the ankle and toe decreased after 6 and 12 weeks in both groups with no difference between the groups. In the legs with the lowest ABI at baseline in each patient, there were no differences regarding ABI, BPs and toe-systolic BP index between the groups after either the intervention or the follow-up period. The BPs decreased in both groups. The walking distance and the time to pain were unchanged in the IVT-group and increased in the C-group after the follow-up period, but without any significant differences between the groups. The level of objectively tested physical activity and self-rated health remained unchanged throughout the study in both the IVT- and the C-group. There were no differences between the changes of the self-rated health data during the study period between the IVT- and the C-group. VacuMed® had no effect per se on distal blood pressures, walking capacity, intermittent claudication symptoms, physical activity and self-rated health.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation
Volume78
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)456-463
Number of pages8
ISSN0036-5513
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

ID: 55417173