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Insulin-like growth factor-I predicts sinusoidal obstruction syndrome following pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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@article{da63e1e01422411596deb6648642e90f,
title = "Insulin-like growth factor-I predicts sinusoidal obstruction syndrome following pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation",
abstract = "Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) initiated through damage of sinusoidal endothelium and inflammation. Insulin-like growth factor-l (IGF-l) maintains and repairs endothelium and intestinal mucosa. We hypothesized that low IGF-l levels may increase the risk of inflammatory complications, such as SOS, in HSCT-patients. We prospectively measured IGF-l concentrations in 121 pediatric patients before, during, and after allogeneic HSCT. Overall, IGF-l levels were significantly reduced compared with healthy sex- and age-matched children. IGF-I levels pre-HSCT and at day 0 were inversely associated with C-reactive protein levels, hyperbilirubinemia, and number of platelet transfusions within the first 21 days post-transplant. Low levels of IGF-I before conditioning and at day of transplant were associated with increased risk of SOS diagnosed by the modified Seattle criteria (pre-HSCT: OR = 1.7 (95% CI: 1.2-2.6, p = 0.01), and the pediatric EBMT criteria (pre-HSCT: 1.7 (1.2-2.5, p = 0.009) and day 0: 1.7 (1.3-2.5, p = 0.001)/SDS decrease in IGF-1). These data suggest that IGF-I is protective against cytotoxic damage and SOS, most likely through trophic effects on endothelial cells and anti-inflammatory properties, and may prove useful as a predictive biomarker of SOS.",
author = "Maria Ebbesen and Sarah Weischendorff and Katrine Kielsen and Marte Kammersgaard and Anders Juul and M{\"u}ller, {Klaus Gottlob}",
year = "2021",
month = may,
doi = "10.1038/s41409-020-01127-3",
language = "English",
volume = "56",
pages = "1021--1030",
journal = "Bone Marrow Transplantation",
issn = "0268-3369",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Insulin-like growth factor-I predicts sinusoidal obstruction syndrome following pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

AU - Ebbesen, Maria

AU - Weischendorff, Sarah

AU - Kielsen, Katrine

AU - Kammersgaard, Marte

AU - Juul, Anders

AU - Müller, Klaus Gottlob

PY - 2021/5

Y1 - 2021/5

N2 - Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) initiated through damage of sinusoidal endothelium and inflammation. Insulin-like growth factor-l (IGF-l) maintains and repairs endothelium and intestinal mucosa. We hypothesized that low IGF-l levels may increase the risk of inflammatory complications, such as SOS, in HSCT-patients. We prospectively measured IGF-l concentrations in 121 pediatric patients before, during, and after allogeneic HSCT. Overall, IGF-l levels were significantly reduced compared with healthy sex- and age-matched children. IGF-I levels pre-HSCT and at day 0 were inversely associated with C-reactive protein levels, hyperbilirubinemia, and number of platelet transfusions within the first 21 days post-transplant. Low levels of IGF-I before conditioning and at day of transplant were associated with increased risk of SOS diagnosed by the modified Seattle criteria (pre-HSCT: OR = 1.7 (95% CI: 1.2-2.6, p = 0.01), and the pediatric EBMT criteria (pre-HSCT: 1.7 (1.2-2.5, p = 0.009) and day 0: 1.7 (1.3-2.5, p = 0.001)/SDS decrease in IGF-1). These data suggest that IGF-I is protective against cytotoxic damage and SOS, most likely through trophic effects on endothelial cells and anti-inflammatory properties, and may prove useful as a predictive biomarker of SOS.

AB - Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) initiated through damage of sinusoidal endothelium and inflammation. Insulin-like growth factor-l (IGF-l) maintains and repairs endothelium and intestinal mucosa. We hypothesized that low IGF-l levels may increase the risk of inflammatory complications, such as SOS, in HSCT-patients. We prospectively measured IGF-l concentrations in 121 pediatric patients before, during, and after allogeneic HSCT. Overall, IGF-l levels were significantly reduced compared with healthy sex- and age-matched children. IGF-I levels pre-HSCT and at day 0 were inversely associated with C-reactive protein levels, hyperbilirubinemia, and number of platelet transfusions within the first 21 days post-transplant. Low levels of IGF-I before conditioning and at day of transplant were associated with increased risk of SOS diagnosed by the modified Seattle criteria (pre-HSCT: OR = 1.7 (95% CI: 1.2-2.6, p = 0.01), and the pediatric EBMT criteria (pre-HSCT: 1.7 (1.2-2.5, p = 0.009) and day 0: 1.7 (1.3-2.5, p = 0.001)/SDS decrease in IGF-1). These data suggest that IGF-I is protective against cytotoxic damage and SOS, most likely through trophic effects on endothelial cells and anti-inflammatory properties, and may prove useful as a predictive biomarker of SOS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85096314494&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41409-020-01127-3

DO - 10.1038/s41409-020-01127-3

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33219341

VL - 56

SP - 1021

EP - 1030

JO - Bone Marrow Transplantation

JF - Bone Marrow Transplantation

SN - 0268-3369

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 61840293