Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Insulin-like growth factor-I predicts sinusoidal obstruction syndrome following pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Calcium transport in male reproduction is possibly influenced by vitamin D and CaSR

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Accelerated loss of oogonia and impaired folliculogenesis in females with Turner syndrome start during early fetal development

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Thyroid function in COVID-19 and the association with cytokine levels and mortality

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. The effects of selected inhibitors on human fetal adrenal steroidogenesis differs under basal and ACTH-stimulated conditions

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is a potentially fatal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) initiated through damage of sinusoidal endothelium and inflammation. Insulin-like growth factor-l (IGF-l) maintains and repairs endothelium and intestinal mucosa. We hypothesized that low IGF-l levels may increase the risk of inflammatory complications, such as SOS, in HSCT-patients. We prospectively measured IGF-l concentrations in 121 pediatric patients before, during, and after allogeneic HSCT. Overall, IGF-l levels were significantly reduced compared with healthy sex- and age-matched children. IGF-I levels pre-HSCT and at day 0 were inversely associated with C-reactive protein levels, hyperbilirubinemia, and number of platelet transfusions within the first 21 days post-transplant. Low levels of IGF-I before conditioning and at day of transplant were associated with increased risk of SOS diagnosed by the modified Seattle criteria (pre-HSCT: OR = 1.7 (95% CI: 1.2-2.6, p = 0.01), and the pediatric EBMT criteria (pre-HSCT: 1.7 (1.2-2.5, p = 0.009) and day 0: 1.7 (1.3-2.5, p = 0.001)/SDS decrease in IGF-1). These data suggest that IGF-I is protective against cytotoxic damage and SOS, most likely through trophic effects on endothelial cells and anti-inflammatory properties, and may prove useful as a predictive biomarker of SOS.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume56
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)1021-1030
Number of pages10
ISSN0268-3369
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

ID: 61840293