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Inspiratory muscle strength and walking capacity in patients with COPD

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@article{549b982dd917477e93b7540a7ba12e74,
title = "Inspiratory muscle strength and walking capacity in patients with COPD",
abstract = "Purpose: It has been suggested that patients with inspiratory muscle weakness could benefit from specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT). We aimed to examine the frequency of patients with inspiratory muscle weakness in a Danish hospital-based outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program, and to evaluate the association between inspiratory muscle strength and peripheral muscle strength and walking capacity. Methods: Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP) was assessed in 97 patients with COPD (39 men, 58 women, mean age years 70 ± 9, forced expiratory volume in 1 s ((FEV1) = 35 ± 10{\%} pred.). The impact of MIP on knee-extension strength, walking distance, and symptom burden was evaluated using multiple linear regression analyses. Results: The MIP of the patients with COPD was 63 (95{\%} CI 59; 67) cmH2O and it was significantly reduced compared to gender and age-matched reference values 76 (95{\%} CI 73; 79) cmH2O (p < 0.001). Seven patients (7.2{\%}) were under the lower limit of normal. MIP was negatively correlated with increasing age, female gender, decreasing knee-extension strength and lower FEV1{\%} pred. Walking distance was associated with knee-extension strength and it was not associated with MIP. Conclusion: Maximal inspiratory pressure was reduced in patients with COPD but only a few patients had a weak MIP. Whilst MIP was associated with leg muscle strength, it was not associated with walking distance or symptoms.",
keywords = "chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Maximal inspiratory strength, physiotherapy, quadriceps strength, walking distance",
author = "Kofod, {Linette Marie} and Tine Hage and Christiansen, {Lene Houmann} and Karin Skalkam and Gerd Martinez and Godtfredsen, {Nina Skavlan} and Stig Molsted",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1080/20018525.2019.1700086",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "European Clinical Respiratory Journal",
issn = "2001-8525",
publisher = "Co-Action Publishing",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inspiratory muscle strength and walking capacity in patients with COPD

AU - Kofod, Linette Marie

AU - Hage, Tine

AU - Christiansen, Lene Houmann

AU - Skalkam, Karin

AU - Martinez, Gerd

AU - Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan

AU - Molsted, Stig

N1 - © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - Purpose: It has been suggested that patients with inspiratory muscle weakness could benefit from specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT). We aimed to examine the frequency of patients with inspiratory muscle weakness in a Danish hospital-based outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program, and to evaluate the association between inspiratory muscle strength and peripheral muscle strength and walking capacity. Methods: Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP) was assessed in 97 patients with COPD (39 men, 58 women, mean age years 70 ± 9, forced expiratory volume in 1 s ((FEV1) = 35 ± 10% pred.). The impact of MIP on knee-extension strength, walking distance, and symptom burden was evaluated using multiple linear regression analyses. Results: The MIP of the patients with COPD was 63 (95% CI 59; 67) cmH2O and it was significantly reduced compared to gender and age-matched reference values 76 (95% CI 73; 79) cmH2O (p < 0.001). Seven patients (7.2%) were under the lower limit of normal. MIP was negatively correlated with increasing age, female gender, decreasing knee-extension strength and lower FEV1% pred. Walking distance was associated with knee-extension strength and it was not associated with MIP. Conclusion: Maximal inspiratory pressure was reduced in patients with COPD but only a few patients had a weak MIP. Whilst MIP was associated with leg muscle strength, it was not associated with walking distance or symptoms.

AB - Purpose: It has been suggested that patients with inspiratory muscle weakness could benefit from specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT). We aimed to examine the frequency of patients with inspiratory muscle weakness in a Danish hospital-based outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program, and to evaluate the association between inspiratory muscle strength and peripheral muscle strength and walking capacity. Methods: Maximal Inspiratory Pressure (MIP) was assessed in 97 patients with COPD (39 men, 58 women, mean age years 70 ± 9, forced expiratory volume in 1 s ((FEV1) = 35 ± 10% pred.). The impact of MIP on knee-extension strength, walking distance, and symptom burden was evaluated using multiple linear regression analyses. Results: The MIP of the patients with COPD was 63 (95% CI 59; 67) cmH2O and it was significantly reduced compared to gender and age-matched reference values 76 (95% CI 73; 79) cmH2O (p < 0.001). Seven patients (7.2%) were under the lower limit of normal. MIP was negatively correlated with increasing age, female gender, decreasing knee-extension strength and lower FEV1% pred. Walking distance was associated with knee-extension strength and it was not associated with MIP. Conclusion: Maximal inspiratory pressure was reduced in patients with COPD but only a few patients had a weak MIP. Whilst MIP was associated with leg muscle strength, it was not associated with walking distance or symptoms.

KW - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

KW - Maximal inspiratory strength

KW - physiotherapy

KW - quadriceps strength

KW - walking distance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85082729816&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/20018525.2019.1700086

DO - 10.1080/20018525.2019.1700086

M3 - Journal article

VL - 7

JO - European Clinical Respiratory Journal

JF - European Clinical Respiratory Journal

SN - 2001-8525

IS - 1

M1 - 1700086

ER -

ID: 58721238