Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Influence of procedural factors on patient procedural pain in relation to diagnostic lumbar puncture

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Building focused cardiac ultrasound capacity in a lower middle-income country: A single centre study to assess training impact

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. qSOFA is a useful prognostic factor for 30-day mortality in infected patients fulfilling the SIRS criteria for sepsis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Early introduction of intraosseous access ought to be emphasized

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Prehospital continuous ECG is valuable for very early detection of atrial fibrillation in patients with acute stroke

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Opinion and Special Articles: Stress when performing the first lumbar puncture may compromise patient safety

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Queue-based modelling and detection of parameters involved in stroke outcome

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Assessment of Residents Readiness to Perform Lumbar Puncture: A Validation Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of local anesthetic (LA), operator experience level and needle type on patient procedural pain in relation to diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP).

METHODS: LP was performed with either a 22 gauge traumatic needle (22 TN) or a 22 gauge atraumatic needle (22 ATN). Immediately after LP patients documented a procedural pain score (PPS) on a 10-point Likert scale. Use of LA, needle type, anesthetic time interval (ATI), number of needle insertions and the LP operator experience level were registered. ATI was defined as the time from administration of LA to first needle insertion.

RESULTS: 104 patients had the LP procedure performed by 66 physicians (40 novices and 26 experienced physicians). Patients having the procedure performed by novices had a lower PPS of 2.56 if LA was administered compared to a higher PPS of 5.80 if LA was not administered (P = .046). Among experienced physicians there was no difference in PPS regardless of administration of LA. If novices administered LA, patient PPS was equal to patients having the procedure performed by an experienced operator. If novices performed the procedure with a 22 TN PPS decreased with increasing ATI (P = .01). No similar correlation was identified with the 22 ATN.

CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that LP operator experience level, the needle type used and ATI may influence patient PPS. Further studies are necessary for final conclusions. These studies must consider these factors to avoid fault conclusions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume46
Pages (from-to)183-187
Number of pages5
ISSN0735-6757
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    Research areas

  • Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anesthesia, Local/methods, Clinical Competence, Denmark, Equipment Design, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Needles, Pain Management, Pain Measurement, Pain, Procedural/etiology, Spinal Puncture

ID: 67940968