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Influence of body mass index on short-term subjective improvement and risk of reoperation after mid-urethral sling surgery

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@article{d74d774010ad4831a2bcb99137613ac5,
title = "Influence of body mass index on short-term subjective improvement and risk of reoperation after mid-urethral sling surgery",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective was to evaluate the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the subjective improvement and risk of reoperation after first-time mid-urethral sling surgery.METHODS: Data were retrieved from the national Danish Urogynaecological Database, including women with first-time surgery with mid-urethral polypropylene slings from 2011 to 2016. The subjective improvement was assessed by the difference in symptoms based on the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) completed pre- and 3 months postoperatively. A reoperation was defined as any new surgical procedure for stress urinary incontinence performed within the study period.RESULTS: During the study period, 6,414 mid-urethral sling procedures were performed; 80.0{\%} of these women filled out both pre- and post-surgical International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICI-Q) forms. 42.4{\%} had a BMI < 25, 34.6{\%} had BMI 25-30, 16.9{\%} had BMI 30-35, and 6.0{\%} BMI >35. The subjective improvement after surgery was high in all BMI categories and there were no differences between the categories. The overall cumulative hazard proportion at 2 years of follow-up was 1.9{\%} (CI 95{\%}: 1.6-2.3) and after 5 years 2.4{\%} (CI 95{\%}: 2.0-2.9). Adjusted for age, smoking, and use of alcohol, the cumulative hazard proportion after 2 years of follow-up was 3.2{\%} (CI 95{\%}: 1.6-6.2) for women with BMI >35 and after 5 years 4.0{\%} (CI 95{\%}: 2.0-7.7), which was the highest proportion of reoperation in the study. The crude hazard ratio was 1.84 (CI 95{\%}: 0.89-3.83) women with BMI >35 and the adjusted hazard ratio was 1.94 (CI 95{\%}: 0.92-4.09).CONCLUSIONS: We found high subjective improvement after the first-time surgery unrelated to BMI. Women with a BMI over 35 had the highest proportion of reoperations, although this was not statistically significant.",
keywords = "Aged, Body Mass Index, Female, Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data, Humans, Middle Aged, Registries, Reoperation/statistics & numerical data, Suburethral Slings/statistics & numerical data",
author = "Vibeke Weltz and Rikke Guldberg and Larsen, {Michael D} and Bjarne Magnussen and Gunnar Lose",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1007/s00192-018-3570-1",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "585--591",
journal = "International Urogynecology Journal",
issn = "0937-3462",
publisher = "Springer U K",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of body mass index on short-term subjective improvement and risk of reoperation after mid-urethral sling surgery

AU - Weltz, Vibeke

AU - Guldberg, Rikke

AU - Larsen, Michael D

AU - Magnussen, Bjarne

AU - Lose, Gunnar

PY - 2018/4

Y1 - 2018/4

N2 - INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective was to evaluate the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the subjective improvement and risk of reoperation after first-time mid-urethral sling surgery.METHODS: Data were retrieved from the national Danish Urogynaecological Database, including women with first-time surgery with mid-urethral polypropylene slings from 2011 to 2016. The subjective improvement was assessed by the difference in symptoms based on the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) completed pre- and 3 months postoperatively. A reoperation was defined as any new surgical procedure for stress urinary incontinence performed within the study period.RESULTS: During the study period, 6,414 mid-urethral sling procedures were performed; 80.0% of these women filled out both pre- and post-surgical International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICI-Q) forms. 42.4% had a BMI < 25, 34.6% had BMI 25-30, 16.9% had BMI 30-35, and 6.0% BMI >35. The subjective improvement after surgery was high in all BMI categories and there were no differences between the categories. The overall cumulative hazard proportion at 2 years of follow-up was 1.9% (CI 95%: 1.6-2.3) and after 5 years 2.4% (CI 95%: 2.0-2.9). Adjusted for age, smoking, and use of alcohol, the cumulative hazard proportion after 2 years of follow-up was 3.2% (CI 95%: 1.6-6.2) for women with BMI >35 and after 5 years 4.0% (CI 95%: 2.0-7.7), which was the highest proportion of reoperation in the study. The crude hazard ratio was 1.84 (CI 95%: 0.89-3.83) women with BMI >35 and the adjusted hazard ratio was 1.94 (CI 95%: 0.92-4.09).CONCLUSIONS: We found high subjective improvement after the first-time surgery unrelated to BMI. Women with a BMI over 35 had the highest proportion of reoperations, although this was not statistically significant.

AB - INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective was to evaluate the impact of body mass index (BMI) on the subjective improvement and risk of reoperation after first-time mid-urethral sling surgery.METHODS: Data were retrieved from the national Danish Urogynaecological Database, including women with first-time surgery with mid-urethral polypropylene slings from 2011 to 2016. The subjective improvement was assessed by the difference in symptoms based on the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF) completed pre- and 3 months postoperatively. A reoperation was defined as any new surgical procedure for stress urinary incontinence performed within the study period.RESULTS: During the study period, 6,414 mid-urethral sling procedures were performed; 80.0% of these women filled out both pre- and post-surgical International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire (ICI-Q) forms. 42.4% had a BMI < 25, 34.6% had BMI 25-30, 16.9% had BMI 30-35, and 6.0% BMI >35. The subjective improvement after surgery was high in all BMI categories and there were no differences between the categories. The overall cumulative hazard proportion at 2 years of follow-up was 1.9% (CI 95%: 1.6-2.3) and after 5 years 2.4% (CI 95%: 2.0-2.9). Adjusted for age, smoking, and use of alcohol, the cumulative hazard proportion after 2 years of follow-up was 3.2% (CI 95%: 1.6-6.2) for women with BMI >35 and after 5 years 4.0% (CI 95%: 2.0-7.7), which was the highest proportion of reoperation in the study. The crude hazard ratio was 1.84 (CI 95%: 0.89-3.83) women with BMI >35 and the adjusted hazard ratio was 1.94 (CI 95%: 0.92-4.09).CONCLUSIONS: We found high subjective improvement after the first-time surgery unrelated to BMI. Women with a BMI over 35 had the highest proportion of reoperations, although this was not statistically significant.

KW - Aged

KW - Body Mass Index

KW - Female

KW - Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Registries

KW - Reoperation/statistics & numerical data

KW - Suburethral Slings/statistics & numerical data

U2 - 10.1007/s00192-018-3570-1

DO - 10.1007/s00192-018-3570-1

M3 - Journal article

VL - 29

SP - 585

EP - 591

JO - International Urogynecology Journal

JF - International Urogynecology Journal

SN - 0937-3462

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 56368705