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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Increased risk of neonatal complications and infections in children of kidney-transplanted women: A nationwide controlled cohort study

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@article{95c610e08b6547aabc3a9e3c391ed83e,
title = "Increased risk of neonatal complications and infections in children of kidney-transplanted women: A nationwide controlled cohort study",
abstract = "Information related to short- and long-term risks of children born to kidney-transplanted women remains limited. With the aim of investigating the risk of neonatal complications, and the short- and long-term risk of infections in offspring of kidney-transplanted women, all children born to kidney-transplanted women in Denmark from 1964 to 2016 were identified in a nationwide retrospective matched cohort study. A total of 124 children of kidney-transplanted women were identified and matched on gender, birth year, and number of siblings at birth 1:10 with children born to non-transplanted women identified in the Danish general population. Prevalence of low birth weight (37.9{\%}, RR=12.61[95{\%}CI 8.5-18.5]), premature birth (46.0{\%}, RR=11.32[95{\%}CI 8.1-15.7]) and malformations (11.3{\%}, RR=1.98[95{\%}CI 1.2-3.4]) was increased in children of kidney-transplanted women compared with controls. Similarly, prevalence of hospitalization due to infection was increased during the first year of life (21.0{\%}, RR=1.94[95{\%} CI 1.3-2.8]), from age one to five (34.2{\%}, RR=1.89[95{\%}CI 1.4-2.5]), and overall (41.9{\%}, RR=1.67[95{\%}CI 1.3-2.1]). The risk of infection was also higher in children of kidney-transplanted mothers born preterm or with low birth weight compared with similar controls. In conclusion, risk of neonatal complications, malformations, and both early and late infection was increased in children born to kidney-transplanted women.",
keywords = "clinical research/practice, epidemiology, immunosuppression/immune modulation, immunosuppressive regimens, innate immunity, kidney transplantation/nephrology, obstetrics and gynecology, pregnancy, reproductive biology",
author = "Pia Egerup and Nicholas Carlson and Oestergaard, {Louise Bruun} and Paul Blanche and Scott, {James R} and Mads Hornum and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Christiansen, {Ole Bjarne}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = "8",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1111/ajt.16259",
language = "English",
journal = "American Journal of Transplantation",
issn = "1600-6135",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased risk of neonatal complications and infections in children of kidney-transplanted women

T2 - A nationwide controlled cohort study

AU - Egerup, Pia

AU - Carlson, Nicholas

AU - Oestergaard, Louise Bruun

AU - Blanche, Paul

AU - Scott, James R

AU - Hornum, Mads

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Christiansen, Ole Bjarne

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/8/12

Y1 - 2020/8/12

N2 - Information related to short- and long-term risks of children born to kidney-transplanted women remains limited. With the aim of investigating the risk of neonatal complications, and the short- and long-term risk of infections in offspring of kidney-transplanted women, all children born to kidney-transplanted women in Denmark from 1964 to 2016 were identified in a nationwide retrospective matched cohort study. A total of 124 children of kidney-transplanted women were identified and matched on gender, birth year, and number of siblings at birth 1:10 with children born to non-transplanted women identified in the Danish general population. Prevalence of low birth weight (37.9%, RR=12.61[95%CI 8.5-18.5]), premature birth (46.0%, RR=11.32[95%CI 8.1-15.7]) and malformations (11.3%, RR=1.98[95%CI 1.2-3.4]) was increased in children of kidney-transplanted women compared with controls. Similarly, prevalence of hospitalization due to infection was increased during the first year of life (21.0%, RR=1.94[95% CI 1.3-2.8]), from age one to five (34.2%, RR=1.89[95%CI 1.4-2.5]), and overall (41.9%, RR=1.67[95%CI 1.3-2.1]). The risk of infection was also higher in children of kidney-transplanted mothers born preterm or with low birth weight compared with similar controls. In conclusion, risk of neonatal complications, malformations, and both early and late infection was increased in children born to kidney-transplanted women.

AB - Information related to short- and long-term risks of children born to kidney-transplanted women remains limited. With the aim of investigating the risk of neonatal complications, and the short- and long-term risk of infections in offspring of kidney-transplanted women, all children born to kidney-transplanted women in Denmark from 1964 to 2016 were identified in a nationwide retrospective matched cohort study. A total of 124 children of kidney-transplanted women were identified and matched on gender, birth year, and number of siblings at birth 1:10 with children born to non-transplanted women identified in the Danish general population. Prevalence of low birth weight (37.9%, RR=12.61[95%CI 8.5-18.5]), premature birth (46.0%, RR=11.32[95%CI 8.1-15.7]) and malformations (11.3%, RR=1.98[95%CI 1.2-3.4]) was increased in children of kidney-transplanted women compared with controls. Similarly, prevalence of hospitalization due to infection was increased during the first year of life (21.0%, RR=1.94[95% CI 1.3-2.8]), from age one to five (34.2%, RR=1.89[95%CI 1.4-2.5]), and overall (41.9%, RR=1.67[95%CI 1.3-2.1]). The risk of infection was also higher in children of kidney-transplanted mothers born preterm or with low birth weight compared with similar controls. In conclusion, risk of neonatal complications, malformations, and both early and late infection was increased in children born to kidney-transplanted women.

KW - clinical research/practice

KW - epidemiology

KW - immunosuppression/immune modulation

KW - immunosuppressive regimens

KW - innate immunity

KW - kidney transplantation/nephrology

KW - obstetrics and gynecology

KW - pregnancy

KW - reproductive biology

U2 - 10.1111/ajt.16259

DO - 10.1111/ajt.16259

M3 - Journal article

JO - American Journal of Transplantation

JF - American Journal of Transplantation

SN - 1600-6135

ER -

ID: 60682024