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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Incidence and impact of parvovirus B19 infection in seronegative solid organ transplant recipients

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Routine monitoring of Parvovirus B19 (B19V) the first six months post-transplantation was performed in 241 seronegative solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Incidence rates (IR) during the 1st month and the 2nd to 6th months post-transplantation were 1.2 (95% CI, 0.33-3.2) and 0.21 (95% CI, 0.06-0.57) per 100 recipients per-month, respectively. Of the 6 SOT recipients with positive B19V PCR, 3 (50%) were admitted to hospital and 2 (33%) were treated with intravenous immunoglobulin. Thus, routine monitoring of B19V in seronegative SOT recipients may not be necessary. Targeted screening one-month post-transplantation and screening upon clinical suspicion could be an alternative strategy.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of infectious diseases
ISSN0022-1899
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Jan 2021

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

ID: 61834104