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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Improving colonoscopy quality through individualised training programmes

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INTRODUCTION: In Denmark, quality-improvement initiatives aimed at providing a better colonoscopy service are few. The primary objective of this study was to improve colonoscopy quality at Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark, using structured training programmes. The secondary aim was to introduce a system for individual colonoscopist performance monitoring.

METHODS: We conducted a colonoscopy-quality pilot study covering two major quality performance indicators: caecum intubation rate (CIR) and polyp detection rate (PDR). The pilot study was followed by colonoscopy training programmes offering experienced colonoscopists colonoscopy skills upgrading, polypectomy and train-the-trainers courses taught by English experts. Junior doctors completed a 20-day module-based colonoscopy-training programme. A regional individual colonoscopy quality-reporting system was developed as a supplementary file within the electronic health records.

RESULTS: The CIR increased from 87.1% to 92.1% (p less-than 0.001) and the PDR from 33.7% to 41.7% (p less-than 0.001) in the course of the structured training programme. Multivariable analysis adjusting for patient sex, patient age and colonoscopy indication showed a significant increase in CIR (p less-than 0.001), but not in PDR (p = 0.19). The colonoscopy quality reporting system was introduced and now provides biannual feedback to all colonoscopists.

CONCLUSIONS: Quality-improvement initiatives may lead to an improved CIR and possibly PDR. Nationwide training programmes and performance monitoring should be implemented to further improve and monitor colonoscopy quality.

FUNDING: none.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberA01200028
JournalDanish Medical Journal
Volume67
Issue number8
ISSN1603-9629
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2020

ID: 60568642