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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Improving bystander defibrillation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests at home

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AIMS: Most out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur at home with dismal bystander defibrillation rates. We investigated automated external defibrillator coverage of home arrests, and the proportion potentially reachable with an automated external defibrillator before emergency medical service arrival according to different bystander activation strategies.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Cardiac arrests in homes (private/nursing/senior homes) in Copenhagen, Denmark (2008-2016) and registered automated external defibrillators (2007-2016), were identified. Automated external defibrillator coverage (distance from arrest to automated external defibrillator) and accessibility at the time of arrest were examined according to route distance to nearest automated external defibrillator and emergency medical service response time. The proportion of arrests reachable with an automated external defibrillator by bystander was calculated using two-way (from patient to automated external defibrillator and back) and one-way (from automated external defibrillator to patient) potential activation strategies. Of 1879 home arrests, automated external defibrillator coverage ≤100 m was low (6.3%) and a two-way bystander could potentially only retrieve an accessible automated external defibrillator before emergency medical service in 31.1% (n=37) of cases. If a bystander only needed to travel one-way to bring an automated external defibrillator (≤100 m, ≤250 m and ≤500 m), 45.4% (n=54/119), 37.1% (n=196/529) and 29.8% (n=350/1174) could potentially be reached before the emergency medical service based on current automated external defibrillator accessibility.

CONCLUSIONS: Few home arrests were reachable with an automated external defibrillator before emergency medical service if bystanders needed to travel from patient to automated external defibrillator and back. However, nearly one-third of arrests ≤500 m of an automated external defibrillator could be reached before emergency medical service arrival if the bystander only needed to travel one-way from the automated external defibrillator to the patient.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean heart journal. Acute cardiovascular care
Pages (from-to)2048872619891675
ISSN2048-8726
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Mar 2020

ID: 59576315