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Impact of surgical resection margins less than 5 mm in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: a systematic review

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@article{e63b6dc8e7b44fcc9d720137b4c979a0,
title = "Impact of surgical resection margins less than 5 mm in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: a systematic review",
abstract = "Background: The width of the surgical resection margin impacts recurrence and survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The most commonly used definition of a clear margin is one larger than 5 mm, although due to anatomical restrictions to e.g. bone or vessels, this size is not always feasible. Margins less than 5 mm affect postsurgical strategies and prognoses, and further knowledge of margins smaller than 5 mm is needed.Aims/objectives: We aimed to systematically review the literature on the impact of surgical resection margins less than 5 mm addressing recurrence and survival in OSCC.Methods/materials: A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases identifying studies regardless of publication date that examined margin less than 5 mm, with or without a comparison to size of 5 mm or greater, in patients with OSCC. We assessed the impact on recurrence and survival.Results: We identified six studies (n = 1514 patients); all studies, investigated recurrence, and three (n = 768 patients) evaluated survival. The studies had noteworthy variability in, e.g. follow-up times, anatomical sublocations, T- and N-stage classifications, and outcome measures. Five studies (n = 1387 patients) reported that margins smaller than 5 mm would be safe and would not affect survival or recurrence negatively compared to their own data on larger margins. One study reported that a clear resection margin greater than five mm was necessary to ensure optimal outcomes.Conclusion/significance: The literature showed significant bias and risk issues. In five of the included studies with 1387 patients, we found in selected cases, where margins larger than 5 mm are not possible, a tendency regarding resection margins less than 5 mm to be sufficient for the surgical treatment of patients with primary OSCC. However, the data is insufficient to enable altered recommendations of resection margins in patients with primary OSCC.",
keywords = "oral cavity, resection margin, squamous cell carcinoma, Systematic review",
author = "Alexandra Bungum and Jensen, {Jakob Schmidt} and Jakobsen, {Kathrine Kronberg} and Anders Christensen and Christian Gr{\o}nh{\o}j and {von Buchwald}, Christian",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1080/00016489.2020.1773532",
language = "English",
volume = "140",
pages = "869--875",
journal = "Acta Oto-Laryngologica",
issn = "0001-6489",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of surgical resection margins less than 5 mm in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Bungum, Alexandra

AU - Jensen, Jakob Schmidt

AU - Jakobsen, Kathrine Kronberg

AU - Christensen, Anders

AU - Grønhøj, Christian

AU - von Buchwald, Christian

PY - 2020/10

Y1 - 2020/10

N2 - Background: The width of the surgical resection margin impacts recurrence and survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The most commonly used definition of a clear margin is one larger than 5 mm, although due to anatomical restrictions to e.g. bone or vessels, this size is not always feasible. Margins less than 5 mm affect postsurgical strategies and prognoses, and further knowledge of margins smaller than 5 mm is needed.Aims/objectives: We aimed to systematically review the literature on the impact of surgical resection margins less than 5 mm addressing recurrence and survival in OSCC.Methods/materials: A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases identifying studies regardless of publication date that examined margin less than 5 mm, with or without a comparison to size of 5 mm or greater, in patients with OSCC. We assessed the impact on recurrence and survival.Results: We identified six studies (n = 1514 patients); all studies, investigated recurrence, and three (n = 768 patients) evaluated survival. The studies had noteworthy variability in, e.g. follow-up times, anatomical sublocations, T- and N-stage classifications, and outcome measures. Five studies (n = 1387 patients) reported that margins smaller than 5 mm would be safe and would not affect survival or recurrence negatively compared to their own data on larger margins. One study reported that a clear resection margin greater than five mm was necessary to ensure optimal outcomes.Conclusion/significance: The literature showed significant bias and risk issues. In five of the included studies with 1387 patients, we found in selected cases, where margins larger than 5 mm are not possible, a tendency regarding resection margins less than 5 mm to be sufficient for the surgical treatment of patients with primary OSCC. However, the data is insufficient to enable altered recommendations of resection margins in patients with primary OSCC.

AB - Background: The width of the surgical resection margin impacts recurrence and survival in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The most commonly used definition of a clear margin is one larger than 5 mm, although due to anatomical restrictions to e.g. bone or vessels, this size is not always feasible. Margins less than 5 mm affect postsurgical strategies and prognoses, and further knowledge of margins smaller than 5 mm is needed.Aims/objectives: We aimed to systematically review the literature on the impact of surgical resection margins less than 5 mm addressing recurrence and survival in OSCC.Methods/materials: A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed and EMBASE databases identifying studies regardless of publication date that examined margin less than 5 mm, with or without a comparison to size of 5 mm or greater, in patients with OSCC. We assessed the impact on recurrence and survival.Results: We identified six studies (n = 1514 patients); all studies, investigated recurrence, and three (n = 768 patients) evaluated survival. The studies had noteworthy variability in, e.g. follow-up times, anatomical sublocations, T- and N-stage classifications, and outcome measures. Five studies (n = 1387 patients) reported that margins smaller than 5 mm would be safe and would not affect survival or recurrence negatively compared to their own data on larger margins. One study reported that a clear resection margin greater than five mm was necessary to ensure optimal outcomes.Conclusion/significance: The literature showed significant bias and risk issues. In five of the included studies with 1387 patients, we found in selected cases, where margins larger than 5 mm are not possible, a tendency regarding resection margins less than 5 mm to be sufficient for the surgical treatment of patients with primary OSCC. However, the data is insufficient to enable altered recommendations of resection margins in patients with primary OSCC.

KW - oral cavity

KW - resection margin

KW - squamous cell carcinoma

KW - Systematic review

U2 - 10.1080/00016489.2020.1773532

DO - 10.1080/00016489.2020.1773532

M3 - Review

C2 - 32564643

VL - 140

SP - 869

EP - 875

JO - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

JF - Acta Oto-Laryngologica

SN - 0001-6489

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 60285435