Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Impact of specific high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes on survival in oropharyngeal cancer

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Use of beta-blockers and risk of contralateral breast cancer

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Low-dose aspirin use and mortality risk in patients with head and neck cancer - a nationwide cohort study of 10,770 patients

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Long-term exposure to air pollution and liver cancer incidence in six European cohorts

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Viral and Genomic Drivers of Squamous Cell Neoplasms Arising in the Lacrimal Drainage System

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Introduction and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 lineage B.1.1.7, Alpha variant, in Denmark

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

The increases observed in incidence and survival of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have been attributed to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, but the survival-impact of specific genotypes is poorly understood. We investigated the potential influence of HPV genotypes on survival in HPV-positive (HPV+) OPSCC. All patients with HPV+/p16+ OPSCC and available genotype data within the period 2011 to 2017 in Eastern Denmark were included. Descriptive statistics on clinical and tumor data, as well as overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) with Cox hazard models and Kaplan-Meier plots were performed. Overall, 769 HPV+/p16+ OPSCC patients were included of which genotype HPV16 accounted for 86% (n = 662). Compared to high-risk non-HPV16 genotypes (HR non-HPV16), HPV16 patients were younger at diagnosis (median years, 60 vs 64), had a higher male to female ratio (3.7:1 vs 2.1:1), and lower performance scores of ≤1 (90%, n = 559, vs 81%, n = 74). Regarding 5-year OS and RFS, no difference was observed between HPV16 and HR non-HPV16 patients. Subgrouping the HR non-HPV16 group into HPV33 (n = 57), HPV35 (n = 26) and "other genotypes" (n = 24) a significantly worse OS in the "other genotypes" group (hazard rate: 2.33, P = .027) was shown. With similar survival results between HPV16 and non-HPV16 genotypes, genotyping in OPSCC is interesting from an epidemiological point of view as well as in vaccination programs, but not a necessary addition in prognostication of HPV+/p16+ OPSCC.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Cancer
Volume150
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)1174-1183
Number of pages10
ISSN0020-7136
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    Research areas

  • head and neck cancer, HPV genotype, human papillomavirus, oropharyngeal cancer, oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

ID: 69825425