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Impact of pre-admission depression on mortality following myocardial infarction

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@article{e253b726b53d4035af96d1b51aab27fa,
title = "Impact of pre-admission depression on mortality following myocardial infarction",
abstract = "Background The prognostic impact of previous depression on myocardial infarction survival remains poorly understood.AimsTo examine the association between depression and all-cause mortality following myocardial infarction.MethodUsing Danish medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. We included all patients with first-time myocardial infarction (1995-2014) and identified previous depression as either a depression diagnosis or use of antidepressants. We used Cox regression to compute adjusted mortality rate ratios (aMRRs) with 95{\%} confidence intervals.ResultsWe identified 170 771 patients with first-time myocardial infarction. Patients with myocardial infarction and a previous depression diagnosis had higher 19-year mortality risks (87{\%}v.78{\%}). The overall aMRR was 1.11 (95{\%} CI 1.07-1.15) increasing to 1.22 (95{\%} CI 1.17-1.27) when including use of antidepressants in the depression definition.ConclusionsA history of depression was associated with a moderately increased all-cause mortality following myocardial infarction.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Denmark, Depressive Disorder, Female, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Journal Article, Observational Study",
author = "Jens Sundb{\o}ll and Morten Schmidt and Kasper Adelborg and Lars Pedersen and B{\o}tker, {Hans Erik} and Poul Videbech and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik Toft}",
note = "{\circledC} The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.",
year = "2017",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1192/bjp.bp.116.194605",
language = "English",
volume = "210",
pages = "356--361",
journal = "British Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0007-1250",
publisher = "Royal College of Psychiatrists",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of pre-admission depression on mortality following myocardial infarction

AU - Sundbøll, Jens

AU - Schmidt, Morten

AU - Adelborg, Kasper

AU - Pedersen, Lars

AU - Bøtker, Hans Erik

AU - Videbech, Poul

AU - Sørensen, Henrik Toft

N1 - © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

PY - 2017/5

Y1 - 2017/5

N2 - Background The prognostic impact of previous depression on myocardial infarction survival remains poorly understood.AimsTo examine the association between depression and all-cause mortality following myocardial infarction.MethodUsing Danish medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. We included all patients with first-time myocardial infarction (1995-2014) and identified previous depression as either a depression diagnosis or use of antidepressants. We used Cox regression to compute adjusted mortality rate ratios (aMRRs) with 95% confidence intervals.ResultsWe identified 170 771 patients with first-time myocardial infarction. Patients with myocardial infarction and a previous depression diagnosis had higher 19-year mortality risks (87%v.78%). The overall aMRR was 1.11 (95% CI 1.07-1.15) increasing to 1.22 (95% CI 1.17-1.27) when including use of antidepressants in the depression definition.ConclusionsA history of depression was associated with a moderately increased all-cause mortality following myocardial infarction.

AB - Background The prognostic impact of previous depression on myocardial infarction survival remains poorly understood.AimsTo examine the association between depression and all-cause mortality following myocardial infarction.MethodUsing Danish medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. We included all patients with first-time myocardial infarction (1995-2014) and identified previous depression as either a depression diagnosis or use of antidepressants. We used Cox regression to compute adjusted mortality rate ratios (aMRRs) with 95% confidence intervals.ResultsWe identified 170 771 patients with first-time myocardial infarction. Patients with myocardial infarction and a previous depression diagnosis had higher 19-year mortality risks (87%v.78%). The overall aMRR was 1.11 (95% CI 1.07-1.15) increasing to 1.22 (95% CI 1.17-1.27) when including use of antidepressants in the depression definition.ConclusionsA history of depression was associated with a moderately increased all-cause mortality following myocardial infarction.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Denmark

KW - Depressive Disorder

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Kaplan-Meier Estimate

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Myocardial Infarction

KW - Prognosis

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Journal Article

KW - Observational Study

U2 - 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.194605

DO - 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.194605

M3 - Journal article

VL - 210

SP - 356

EP - 361

JO - British Journal of Psychiatry

JF - British Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0007-1250

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 52710726