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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Impact of pre-admission depression on mortality following myocardial infarction

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Background The prognostic impact of previous depression on myocardial infarction survival remains poorly understood.AimsTo examine the association between depression and all-cause mortality following myocardial infarction.MethodUsing Danish medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population-based cohort study. We included all patients with first-time myocardial infarction (1995-2014) and identified previous depression as either a depression diagnosis or use of antidepressants. We used Cox regression to compute adjusted mortality rate ratios (aMRRs) with 95% confidence intervals.ResultsWe identified 170 771 patients with first-time myocardial infarction. Patients with myocardial infarction and a previous depression diagnosis had higher 19-year mortality risks (87%v.78%). The overall aMRR was 1.11 (95% CI 1.07-1.15) increasing to 1.22 (95% CI 1.17-1.27) when including use of antidepressants in the depression definition.ConclusionsA history of depression was associated with a moderately increased all-cause mortality following myocardial infarction.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science
Volume210
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)356-361
Number of pages6
ISSN0007-1250
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2017

    Research areas

  • Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Denmark, Depressive Disorder, Female, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Myocardial Infarction, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Journal Article, Observational Study

ID: 52710726