Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Image cytometer method for automated assessment of human spermatozoa concentration

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. An update on semen quality among young Finnish men and comparison with Danish data

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. European Academy of Andrology Newsletter (Edition December 2018)

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Is the FSHR 2039A>G variant associated with susceptibility to testicular germ cell cancer?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. High maternal age at first and subsequent child births in Denmark in the mid-1800s-Letter to the editor

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Characterisation and localisation of the endocannabinoid system components in the adult human testis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Possible link between FSH and RANKL release from adipocytes in men with impaired gonadal function including Klinefelter syndrome

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations
In the basic clinical work-up of infertile couples, a semen analysis is mandatory and the sperm concentration is one of the most essential variables to be determined. Sperm concentration is usually assessed by manual counting using a haemocytometer and is hence labour intensive and may be subjected to investigator bias. Here we show that image cytometry can be used to accurately measure the sperm concentration of human semen samples with great ease and reproducibility. The impact of several factors (pipetting, mixing, round cell content, sperm concentration), which can influence the read-out as well as inter-operator and -cytometer variation on two different image cytometers (NC-3000 and SP-100) were evaluated. Furthermore, 725 semen samples were assessed both by manual assessment (WHO recommended method) and by image cytometry and tight correlations between the measured concentrations were shown. Moreover, by evaluation of repeated measurements it appeared that image cytometry produced more consistent and accurate measurements than manual counting of human spermatozoa concentration. In conclusion, image cytometry provides an appealing substitute of manual counting by providing reliable, robust and easy measurement of human sperm concentration.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAndrology
Volume1
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)615-23
Number of pages9
ISSN2047-2927
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

ID: 39020828