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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Identifying Facilitators and Barriers for Patient Safety in a Medicine Label Design System Using Patient Simulation and Interviews

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

  2. Understanding Medication Dispensing as Done in Real Work Settings: Combining Conceptual Models and an Empirical Approach

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Bodies in Simulation

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

  5. Commentary on Reflecting on Interprofessional Simulation

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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OBJECTIVES: Medicine label design plays an important role in improving patient safety. This study aimed at identifying facilitators and barriers in a medicine label system to prevent medication errors in clinical use by health care professionals.

METHODS: The study design is qualitative and exploratory, with a convenience sample of 10 nurses and 10 physicians from different acute care specialties working in hospitals in the Capital Region of Denmark. In 2 patient simulation scenarios and a sorting task, the participants selected the medicines from a range of ampules, vials, and infusion bags. After each scenario and in the end of the study, the participants were interviewed. Notes were validated with the participants, and content was analyzed.

RESULTS: The label design benefited from the standardized construction of the labels, the clear layout and font, and some warning signs. The complexity of the system and some inconsistencies (different meaning of colors) posed challenges, when considered with the actual application context, in which there is little time to get familiar with the design features.

CONCLUSIONS: For optimizing medicine labels and obtaining the full benefit of label design features on patient safety, it is necessary to consider the context in which they are used.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Patient Safety
Volume12
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)210-222
Number of pages13
ISSN1549-8417
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

    Research areas

  • Adult, Attitude of Health Personnel, Denmark, Drug Labeling, Female, Hospitals, Humans, Male, Medication Errors, Middle Aged, Nurses, Patient Safety, Patient Simulation, Physicians, Problem Solving, Safety Management, Journal Article

ID: 51803207