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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Evidence-based postoperative pain management after laparoscopic colorectal surgery

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  1. Pouch Failures Following Ileal Pouch-anal Anastomosis for Ulcerative Colitis

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  2. The Effect of a Multidisciplinary Regional Educational Programme on the Quality of Colon Cancer Resection

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  3. The safety of complete mesocolic excision once again confirmed

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  4. Symptom load and individual symptoms before and after repair of parastomal hernia: a prospective single centre study

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  1. Indwelling urinary catheterisation may increase risk of complications in hip and knee arthroplasty

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  2. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is rare after fast-track hip- and knee arthroplasty - But potentially related to opioid use

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  3. Enhanced recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction reduces length of postoperative stay: An observational cohort study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Enhanced Recovery Pathways: Looking Into the Future

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  • G P Joshi
  • F Bonnet
  • H Kehlet
  • on behalf of the PROSPECT collaboration
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Aim  The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the available literature on the management of pain after laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Method  Randomized studies, published in English between January 1995 and July 2011, assessing analgesic and anaesthetic interventions in adults undergoing laparoscopic colorectal surgery, and reporting pain scores, were retrieved from the Embase and MEDLINE databases. The efficacy and adverse effects of the analgesic techniques was assessed. The recommendations were based on procedure-specific evidence from a systematic review and supplementary transferable evidence from other relevant procedures. Results  Of the 170 randomized studies identified, 12 studies were included. Overall, all approaches including ketorolac, methylprednisolone, intraperitoneal instillation of ropivacaine, intravenous lidocaine infusion, intrathecal morphine and epidural analgesia improved pain relief, reduced opioid requirements and improved bowel function. However, there were significant differences in the study designs and the variables evaluated, precluding quantitative analysis. The L'Abbé plots of the data from the epidural analgesia studies included in this review indicate that the pain scores in the nonepidural groups, although higher than those in the epidural groups, were within an acceptable level (i.e.
Original languageEnglish
JournalColorectal Disease
Volume15
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)146-155
Number of pages10
ISSN1462-8910
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

ID: 36759369