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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Substance use during pregnancy and postnatal outcomes

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Cognitive and social development in preschool children born to women using substances

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Mental disorders in childhood and young adulthood among children born to women with fertility problems

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Cognitive, Emotional and Social Development in Adolescents Born to Substance Using Women

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Forbrug af rusmidler I graviditeten og postnatale konsekvenser

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleCommunication

  4. Kognitiv, emotionel og social udvikling hos unge født af kvinder med forbrug af rusmidler i graviditeten

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleCommunication

  5. Cognitive and social development in preschool children born to women using substances

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Substance exposure in utero has been associated with physical birth defects and increased risk of regulatory and neuropsychological difficulties. The aims of this study were to describe women who use substances and are in treatment with respect to the type and number of substances used during pregnancy, as well as their background, and to examine the effect substance use has on gestational age, birth weight, and the development of neonatal abstinence syndrome at birth. A sample of 161 pregnant women and their 163 newborn children were included. The results indicate that the children whose mothers continued to use substances throughout their pregnancies were born at a lower gestational age (Chi-Square = 15.1(2), P <.01); children exposed to poly-substances in utero were more affected than those exposed to only alcohol and those with no substance exposure. The same children were more vulnerable to the development of neonatal abstinence syndrome at birth (Chi-Square = 51.7(2), P <.001). Newborns who were exposed primarily to alcohol in utero were at a significant risk of being born with low birth weight (Chi-Square = 8.8(2), P <.05) compared with those exposed to other types of substances. More than 50% of the mothers ceased using any substances (with the exception of tobacco) by birth, indicating that the treatment program did have an interventional effect on the mothers. The mothers' ability to either cease or decrease the use of substances during pregnancy appears to have direct positive effect on their newborns.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Addictive Diseases
Volume31
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)19-28
Number of pages10
ISSN1055-0887
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Research areas

  • Adolescent, Adult, Birth Weight, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Male, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Pregnancy Outcome, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects, Retrospective Studies, Social Class, Substance-Related Disorders, Young Adult

ID: 36512489