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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Earlier testing for HIV--how do we prevent late presentation?

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  1. Uptake of tenofovir-based antiretroviral therapy among HIV-HBV-coinfected patients in the EuroSIDA study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Predictive value of prostate specific antigen in a European HIV-positive cohort: does one size fit all?

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  1. Syphilitic hepatitis and neurosyphilis: an observational study of Danish HIV-infected individuals during a 13-year period

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Establishing a hepatitis C continuum of care among HIV/hepatitis C virus-coinfected individuals in EuroSIDA

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  3. Limited anti-HIV neutralizing antibody breadth and potency before and after HIV superinfection in Danish men who have sex with men

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  4. HIV infection is independently associated with a higher concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin

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HIV testing policies and practices vary widely across Europe. It is clear that there are individuals who might present late for HIV diagnosis and care within all risk groups, and potentially in any healthcare setting. This article explores the need to ensure earlier identification and treatment of late-presenting patients by reviewing strategies that might be considered. Such strategies could include routine provider-initiated HIV testing of at-risk groups in settings such as sexually transmitted infection clinics, drug dependency programmes or antenatal care. Healthcare providers might also consider routine HIV testing in all healthcare facilities, in settings including emergency and primary care, where local HIV prevalence is above a threshold that should be further evaluated. They should also take advantage of rapid testing technologies and be aware of barriers to HIV testing among specific groups to provide opportunities for testing that are relevant to local communities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAntiviral Therapy
Volume15 Suppl 1
Pages (from-to)17-24
Number of pages8
ISSN1359-6535
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2010

ID: 32218282