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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Understanding mild persistent asthma in children: the next frontier

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  1. How does parental history of atopic disease predict the risk of atopic dermatitis in a child? A systematic review and meta-analysis

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  2. Skin barrier damage after exposure to paraphenylenediamine

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  1. Distinct immune phenotypes in infants developing asthma during childhood

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  2. Prenatal dietary supplements influence the infant airway microbiota in a randomized factorial clinical trial

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  3. Virulent coliphages in 1-year-old children fecal samples are fewer, but more infectious than temperate coliphages

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  4. Fish oil supplementation during pregnancy is protective against asthma/wheeze in offspring

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Limitations in asthma prevalence studies and difficulties in diagnosing pediatric asthma lead to uncertainty over the full extent of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents. Although recent surveys have reported that the majority of pediatric patients with asthma in the United States and Europe have symptoms consistent with mild disease, these surveys have limitations in design. Thus, the true prevalence of mild asthma remains unknown. It is unclear whether children with mild persistent asthma progress to more severe asthma, but the risk of severe asthma exacerbations seems to be unrelated to the symptom severity. Clinical studies restricted to pediatric patients with mild asthma are limited, but available data do suggest substantial morbidity of mild persistent asthma in this population and support inhaled corticosteroid intervention. There is a need for further investigation into the true prevalence of mild persistent asthma in children and adolescents, and optimal treatment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
Volume115
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)708-13
Number of pages6
ISSN0091-6749
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

    Research areas

  • Adolescent, Adult, Anti-Asthmatic Agents, Asthma, Child, Data Collection, Humans, Prevalence, Prognosis, Research Design

ID: 45773217