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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Lingual nerve injury II. Observations on sensory recovery after micro-neurosurgical reconstruction

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  1. Iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve: etiology, signs and symptoms, and observations on recovery

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  2. Lingual nerve injury in third molar surgery I. Observations on recovery of sensation with spontaneous healing

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  3. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

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  4. Internal fixation of severely displaced mandibular condylar neck fracture with the aid of ramus osteotomy. A revised technique

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  1. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP): report of a case with extra-articular ankylosis of the mandible

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  2. Association between third mandibular molar impaction and degree of root development in adolescents

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  3. Injection Injuries of the Trigeminal Nerve

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The aim of this study was to report on neurosensory recovery after micro-surgical lingual nerve repair, and to evaluate the effect on recovery of age, delay in repair and gender of the patient. Seventy-four patients entered the study. The micro-surgical repair performed was direct nerve suture (n=71), external neurolysis (n=2) and excision of neuroma without nerve coaptation (n=1). A standardized neurosensory examination was employed in all patients before surgery and during follow up. Recovery was significant for perception of all tested stimuli: feather light touch, pin prick, pointed/dull discrimination, warm, cold, location of touch, and brush stroke direction, pain perception and two-point discrimination. The rate of recovery was highest during the first 6 months. Females were more often affected than males, but recovery was not influenced by gender. The distribution of neurogenic discomfort (paraesthesia, etc.) remained essentially unchanged. Disregarding cases with poor recovery, delay of surgery had a small but significant influence on the regain of neurosensory function of the lingual nerve whereas age had no such effect. None of the patients recovered to normal. Lingual nerve injury seriously affects the quality of life of patients, and micro-surgical repair is beneficial in the absence of spontaneous recovery.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume36
Issue number12
Pages (from-to)1139-45
Number of pages7
ISSN0901-5027
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007

    Research areas

  • Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Epidemiologic Methods, Facial Nerve Injuries, Female, Humans, Lingual Nerve, Male, Microsurgery, Middle Aged, Oral Surgical Procedures, Recovery of Function, Sex Factors, Somatosensory Disorders, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome

ID: 32801465