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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Homocysteine and coronary heart disease: meta-analysis of MTHFR case-control studies, avoiding publication bias

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  • Robert Clarke
  • Derrick A Bennett
  • Sarah Parish
  • Petra Verhoef
  • Mariska Dötsch-Klerk
  • Mark Lathrop
  • Peng Xu
  • Børge G Nordestgaard
  • Hilma Holm
  • Jemma C Hopewell
  • Danish Saleheen
  • Toshihiro Tanaka
  • Sonia S Anand
  • John C Chambers
  • Marcus E Kleber
  • Willem H Ouwehand
  • Yoshiji Yamada
  • Clara Elbers
  • Bas Peters
  • Alexandre F R Stewart
  • Muredach M Reilly
  • Barbara Thorand
  • Salim Yusuf
  • James C Engert
  • Themistocles L Assimes
  • Jaspal Kooner
  • John Danesh
  • Hugh Watkins
  • Nilesh J Samani
  • Rory Collins
  • Richard Peto
  • MTHFR Studies Collaborative Group
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Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreciably increases homocysteine levels, so "Mendelian randomization" studies using this variant as an instrumental variable could help test causality.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPLoS Medicine
Volume9
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)e1001177
ISSN1549-1676
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

    Research areas

  • Bias (Epidemiology), Coronary Disease, Folic Acid, Genotype, Homocysteine, Humans, Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2), Polymorphism, Genetic, Risk Factors

ID: 36738566