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Toxic metabolic syndrome associated with HAART

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Acquired fat redistribution, that is, peripheral fat loss often accompanied by central fat accumulation in patients with HIV infection is the most common form of lipodystrophy in man. Approximately 30 - 50% of HIV-infected individuals after > or = 12 months on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may encounter the HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS), which attenuates patient compliance to this treatment. HALS is characterised by impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and other risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This review depicts the metabolic abnormalities associated with HAART by describing the key cell and organ systems that are involved, emphasising the role of insulin resistance. An opinion on the remedies available to treat the metabolic abnormalities and phenotype of HALS is provided.
Translated title of the contributionToxic metabolic syndrome associated with HAART
Original languageEnglish
JournalExpert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol
Volume2
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)429-45
Publication statusPublished - 2006

ID: 32547746