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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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The RecordAF study: design, baseline data, and profile of patients according to chosen treatment strategy for atrial fibrillation

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The REgistry on Cardiac rhythm disORDers assessing the control of Atrial Fibrillation (RecordAF) is the first worldwide, 1-year observational, longitudinal study of the management of paroxysmal/persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) in recently diagnosed patients. The study was conducted at 532 sites in 21 countries across Europe, America, and Asia; recruitment was completed in April 2008. The primary objectives were to prospectively assess the therapeutic success and clinical outcomes in rhythm- and rate-control strategies. The study design and patient baseline data are reported. A total of 5,814 patients with AF were registered, and 5,604 were eligible for evaluation. Rhythm- and rate-control strategies were applied to 55% and 45% of patients, respectively, at study inclusion. Rhythm-control patients mainly received class III agents (45%) or beta blockers (51%), except for sotalol, and rate-control patients mainly received beta blockers (72%), except for sotalol, or cardiac glycosides (34%). Patients receiving a rhythm-control strategy were younger, had a lower resting heart rate, were more frequently symptomatic, and were more likely to have recently diagnosed AF or paroxysmal AF compared to patients receiving a rate-control strategy. A rate-control strategy was more common in patients with a history of heart failure or valvular heart disease and persistent AF. Rate-control patients more often had previous electrocardiographic evidence of AF and were not in sinus rhythm at inclusion (p
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe American journal of cardiology
Volume105
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)687-93
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2010

ID: 32181411