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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Continuous glucose monitoring-enabled insulin-pump therapy in diabetic pregnancy

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We describe the feasibility of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM)-enabled insulin-pump therapy during pregnancy in a woman with type 1 diabetes, who was treated with CGM-enabled insulin-pump therapy in her third pregnancy. During her first pregnancy, the woman was treated with multiple daily injections and baseline HbA1c was 8.9%. Due to pre-eclampsia, the child was born preterm, and had neonatal hypoglycemia. In the planning of the second pregnancy, insulin-pump therapy was initiated, resulting in an HbA1c of 6.8% in early pregnancy. Due to pre-eclampsia, the second child was born preterm, but without neonatal morbidity. Before her third pregnancy, CGM-enabled insulin-pump therapy was introduced, and HbA1c was 6.4% in early pregnancy. The patient was satisfied with this therapy, pre-eclampsia did not occur, and the child was born at term without neonatal morbidity. CGM-enabled insulin-pump therapy appears feasible in diabetic pregnancies.
Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume89
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)1233-7
Number of pages5
ISSN0001-6349
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2010

ID: 31014005