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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Influence of surgeon's experience and supervision on re-operation rate after hip fracture surgery

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  1. Delay in detection and treatment of perioperative anemia in hip fracture surgery and its impact on postoperative outcomes

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  2. Hip fractures in the non-elderly-Who, why and whither?

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  3. Physiotherapy following fragility fractures

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  4. Anaesthetic aspects in the treatment of fragility fracture patients

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  5. Should we bury K-wires after metacarpal and phalangeal fracture osteosynthesis?

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  1. Intensive screening for osteoporosis in patients with hip fracture

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Delay in detection and treatment of perioperative anemia in hip fracture surgery and its impact on postoperative outcomes

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  3. Perioperative haemodynamics and vasoconstriction: time for reconsideration?

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OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of the performing surgeon's experience and degree of supervision on re-operation rate among patients admitted with a proximal femoral fracture (PFF). METHODS: Prospective study of 600 consecutive patients with proximal femoral fracture in our multimodal rehabilitation programme, between 2002 and 2004. Re-operation rate was assessed 6 months postoperatively. Surgeons were grouped as unsupervised junior registrars versus experienced surgeons operating or supervising. Fractures were stratified as technically undemanding or demanding. RESULTS: Unsupervised junior registrars operated on 23% (137/600) of all and 15% (56/365) of technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. The latter had a higher re-operation rate within 6 months, compared with the rate when more experienced surgeons were present. In logistic regression analysis combining age, gender, American Society of Anaesthesiologists score, New Mobility Score, time to surgery and type of implant, surgery by unsupervised junior registrars was still a significant independent risk factor for re-operation in technically demanding proximal femoral fractures. CONCLUSION: Unsupervised junior registrars should not operate on technically demanding proximal femoral fractures.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInjury
Volume38
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)775-9
Number of pages4
ISSN0020-1383
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Research areas

  • Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Clinical Competence, Female, Hip Fractures, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Orthopedics, Prospective Studies, Recurrence, Reoperation

ID: 32569331