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Hypoxaemia during recovery after surgery for colorectal cancer: a prospective observational study

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Harvard

Bojesen, RD, Fitzgerald, P, Munk-Madsen, P, Eriksen, JR, Kehlet, H & Gögenur, I 2019, 'Hypoxaemia during recovery after surgery for colorectal cancer: a prospective observational study' Anaesthesia, vol. 74, no. 8, pp. 1009–1017. https://doi.org/10.1111/anae.14691

APA

Bojesen, R. D., Fitzgerald, P., Munk-Madsen, P., Eriksen, J. R., Kehlet, H., & Gögenur, I. (2019). Hypoxaemia during recovery after surgery for colorectal cancer: a prospective observational study. Anaesthesia, 74(8), 1009–1017. https://doi.org/10.1111/anae.14691

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bojesen, R D ; Fitzgerald, P ; Munk-Madsen, P ; Eriksen, Jens Ravn ; Kehlet, H ; Gögenur, Ismail. / Hypoxaemia during recovery after surgery for colorectal cancer : a prospective observational study. In: Anaesthesia. 2019 ; Vol. 74, No. 8. pp. 1009–1017.

Bibtex

@article{8787e2bef21747bd84490248cc45e3e1,
title = "Hypoxaemia during recovery after surgery for colorectal cancer: a prospective observational study",
abstract = "Episodic and ongoing hypoxaemia are well-described after surgery, but, to date, no studies have investigated the occurrence of episodic hypoxaemia following minimally-invasive colorectal surgery performed in an enhanced recovery setting. We aimed to describe the occurrence of postoperative hypoxaemia after minimally-invasive surgery in an enhanced recovery setting, and the association with morphine use, incision site, fluid intake and troponin increase. We performed a prospective observational study of 85 patients undergoing minimally-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer between 25 August 2016 and 17 August 2017. We applied a pulse oximeter with a measurement rate of 1 Hz immediately after surgery either until discharge or until two days after surgery, and recorded the oxygen saturation. We measured troponin I during the first four days after surgery, or until discharge. The median (IQR [range]) length of stay was 3 (2-4 [1-38]) days. Thirty-six percent of patients spent more than 1 h below an oxygen saturation of 90{\%} (4.2{\%} of the day), and with a median (IQR [range]) proportion of 1.3 (0.2-11.1 [0.0-21.4]){\%} of the day spent with an oxygen saturation below 88{\%}. We found no associations between time spent below an oxygen saturation of 88{\%} and morphine use (p = 0.215), fluid intake (p = 0.446), complications (p = 0.808) or extraction site (p = 0.623). Postoperative increases in troponin I were associated both with time spent below an oxygen saturation of 88{\%} (p = 0.026) and hypopnoea episodes (p = 0.003). Even with minimally-invasive surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery, episodic hypoxaemia and hypopnoea episodes are common, but are not associated with morphine use, fluid intake or incision site. Further studies should investigate the relationship between hypoxaemia and troponin increase.",
author = "Bojesen, {R D} and P Fitzgerald and P Munk-Madsen and Eriksen, {Jens Ravn} and H Kehlet and Ismail G{\"o}genur",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 Association of Anaesthetists.",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "17",
doi = "10.1111/anae.14691",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "1009–1017",
journal = "Anaesthesia",
issn = "0003-2409",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hypoxaemia during recovery after surgery for colorectal cancer

T2 - a prospective observational study

AU - Bojesen, R D

AU - Fitzgerald, P

AU - Munk-Madsen, P

AU - Eriksen, Jens Ravn

AU - Kehlet, H

AU - Gögenur, Ismail

N1 - © 2019 Association of Anaesthetists.

PY - 2019/5/17

Y1 - 2019/5/17

N2 - Episodic and ongoing hypoxaemia are well-described after surgery, but, to date, no studies have investigated the occurrence of episodic hypoxaemia following minimally-invasive colorectal surgery performed in an enhanced recovery setting. We aimed to describe the occurrence of postoperative hypoxaemia after minimally-invasive surgery in an enhanced recovery setting, and the association with morphine use, incision site, fluid intake and troponin increase. We performed a prospective observational study of 85 patients undergoing minimally-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer between 25 August 2016 and 17 August 2017. We applied a pulse oximeter with a measurement rate of 1 Hz immediately after surgery either until discharge or until two days after surgery, and recorded the oxygen saturation. We measured troponin I during the first four days after surgery, or until discharge. The median (IQR [range]) length of stay was 3 (2-4 [1-38]) days. Thirty-six percent of patients spent more than 1 h below an oxygen saturation of 90% (4.2% of the day), and with a median (IQR [range]) proportion of 1.3 (0.2-11.1 [0.0-21.4])% of the day spent with an oxygen saturation below 88%. We found no associations between time spent below an oxygen saturation of 88% and morphine use (p = 0.215), fluid intake (p = 0.446), complications (p = 0.808) or extraction site (p = 0.623). Postoperative increases in troponin I were associated both with time spent below an oxygen saturation of 88% (p = 0.026) and hypopnoea episodes (p = 0.003). Even with minimally-invasive surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery, episodic hypoxaemia and hypopnoea episodes are common, but are not associated with morphine use, fluid intake or incision site. Further studies should investigate the relationship between hypoxaemia and troponin increase.

AB - Episodic and ongoing hypoxaemia are well-described after surgery, but, to date, no studies have investigated the occurrence of episodic hypoxaemia following minimally-invasive colorectal surgery performed in an enhanced recovery setting. We aimed to describe the occurrence of postoperative hypoxaemia after minimally-invasive surgery in an enhanced recovery setting, and the association with morphine use, incision site, fluid intake and troponin increase. We performed a prospective observational study of 85 patients undergoing minimally-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer between 25 August 2016 and 17 August 2017. We applied a pulse oximeter with a measurement rate of 1 Hz immediately after surgery either until discharge or until two days after surgery, and recorded the oxygen saturation. We measured troponin I during the first four days after surgery, or until discharge. The median (IQR [range]) length of stay was 3 (2-4 [1-38]) days. Thirty-six percent of patients spent more than 1 h below an oxygen saturation of 90% (4.2% of the day), and with a median (IQR [range]) proportion of 1.3 (0.2-11.1 [0.0-21.4])% of the day spent with an oxygen saturation below 88%. We found no associations between time spent below an oxygen saturation of 88% and morphine use (p = 0.215), fluid intake (p = 0.446), complications (p = 0.808) or extraction site (p = 0.623). Postoperative increases in troponin I were associated both with time spent below an oxygen saturation of 88% (p = 0.026) and hypopnoea episodes (p = 0.003). Even with minimally-invasive surgery and enhanced recovery after surgery, episodic hypoxaemia and hypopnoea episodes are common, but are not associated with morphine use, fluid intake or incision site. Further studies should investigate the relationship between hypoxaemia and troponin increase.

U2 - 10.1111/anae.14691

DO - 10.1111/anae.14691

M3 - Journal article

VL - 74

SP - 1009

EP - 1017

JO - Anaesthesia

JF - Anaesthesia

SN - 0003-2409

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 57290657