Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Hypoglycemia-Associated EEG Changes Following Antecedent Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Glucose Sensor Accuracy After Subcutaneous Glucagon Injections Near to Sensor Site

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Comparison of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Accuracy Between Abdominal and Upper Arm Insertion Sites

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Skin Problems Due to Treatment with Technology Are Associated with Increased Disease Burden Among Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. DIWHY – Motivations, barriers and retention factors of DIY artificial pancreas users in real world use

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference abstract in journalResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Recurrent hypoglycemia has been shown to blunt hypoglycemia symptom scores and counterregulatory hormonal responses during subsequent hypoglycemia. We therefore studied whether hypoglycemia-associated electroencephalogram (EEG) changes are affected by an antecedent episode of hypoglycemia.

METHODS: Twenty-four patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (10 with normal hypoglycemia awareness, 14 with hypoglycemia unawareness) were studied on 2 consecutive days by hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp at hypoglycemia (2.0-2.5 mmol/L) during a 1-h period. EEG was recorded, cognitive function assessed, and hypoglycemia symptom scores and counterregulatory hormonal responses were obtained.

RESULTS: Twenty-one patients completed the study. Hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes were identified on both days with no differences in power or frequency distribution in the theta, alpha, or the combined theta-alpha band during hypoglycemia on the 2 days. Similar degree of cognitive dysfunction was also present during hypoglycemia on both days. When comparing the aware and unaware group, there were no differences in the hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes. There were very subtle differences in cognitive function between the two groups on day 2. The symptom response was higher in the aware group on both days, while only subtle differences were seen in the counterregulatory hormonal response.

CONCLUSION: Antecedent hypoglycemia does not affect hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Original languageEnglish
JournalDiabetes Technology and Therapeutics
Volume19
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)85-90
ISSN1520-9156
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

ID: 49734191