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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Hypertension impairs hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in men

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  • Vinicius P Garcia
  • Helena N M Rocha
  • Marcos P Rocha
  • João D Mattos
  • Monique O Campos
  • Daniel E Mansur
  • Niels H Secher
  • Antonio C L Nóbrega
  • Igor A Fernandes
  • Natália G Rocha
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OBJECTIVE: The inability of the organism to appropriately respond to hypoxia results in abnormal cell metabolism and function. Hypoxia-induced angiogenesis seems to be suppressed in experimental models of hypertension; however, this hypothesis has not been tested in humans. We examined changes in endothelial biomarkers and vascular chemoattraction/angiogenic capacity in response to isocapnic hypoxia in hypertensive men.

METHODS: Twelve normotensive (38 ± 10 years) and nine hypertensive men (45 ± 11 years) were exposed to 5-min trials of normoxia (21% O2) and isocapnic hypoxia (10% O2). During the last minute of each trial, venous blood was drawn. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs; CD45/CD34/VEGFR2), endothelial microvesicles (apoptotic EMVs, CD42b/CD31/AnnexinV; endothelial activation, CD62E/CD144), nitrite, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) were measured.

RESULTS: During normoxia, EPCs, nitrite, endothelial activation, and SDF-1 were similar between groups, whereas VEGF was lower (P = 0.02) and apoptotic EMVs tended to increase (P = 0.07) in hypertensive men. During isocapnic hypoxia, endothelial activation increased in both groups (normotensive, P = 0.007 vs. normoxia; hypertensive, P = 0.006 vs. normoxia), whereas EMVs were higher only in the hypertensive group (P = 0.03 vs. normotensive). EPCs (P = 0.01 vs. normoxia; P = 0.03 vs. hypertensive men), NO (P = 0.01 vs. normoxia; P = 0.04 vs. hypertensive), and VEGF (P = 0.02 vs. normoxia; P = 0.0005 vs. hypertensive) increased only in normotensive individuals in response to isocapnic hypoxia. SDF-1 did not change in either group.

CONCLUSION: These results suggest that hypertension-induced impairment in angiogenesis in response to isocapnic hypoxia is related to disrupted NO bioavailability, VEGF chemotactic signaling, and EPC mobilization.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Hypertension
Volume38
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)1131-1139
Number of pages9
ISSN0263-6352
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2020

ID: 62408684