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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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How to include medical students in your healthcare simulation centre workforce

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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Running simulation centre activities requires a substantial amount of human resources. Here we present ideas on how medical students can be integrated into the simulation centre workforce to support the goal of delivering simulation-based education. The ideas are centred around the many different roles the students can fulfil and how this can be applied in other centres interested in integrating medical students into the workforce. The ideas are based on the experience from a regional Danish simulation centre, the Copenhagen Academy for Medical Education and Simulation (CAMES), where the work of medical students appears to be beneficial for both students, teaching and research faculty, and the growth of the simulation centre.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAdvances in Simulation
Volume5
Pages (from-to)1
ISSN2059-0628
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2020

ID: 58953538