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How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage

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Johansson, Pär I ; Stensballe, Jakob ; Oliveri, Roberto ; Wade, Charles E ; Ostrowski, Sisse R ; Holcomb, John B. / How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage. In: Blood. 2014 ; Vol. 124, No. 20. pp. 3052-8.

Bibtex

@article{2c346f7a1342495ab6157bbf2e37c51e,
title = "How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage",
abstract = "Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids and red blood cells (RBC) in the early phase, and plasma and platelets in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid 1990ties, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance of the adequacy of whole blood hemostatic tests to monitor these patients. Thus, in 2005, a strategy aiming at avoiding coagulopathy by pro-active resuscitation with blood products in a balanced ratio of RBC:plasma:platelets was introduced and this has been reported to be associated with reduced mortality in observational studies. Concurrently, whole blood viscoelastic hemostatic assays (VHA) have gained acceptance by allowing a rapid and timely identification of coagulopathy along with enabling an individualized, goal-directed transfusion therapy. These strategies joined together seem beneficial for patient outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We here present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage.",
author = "Johansson, {P{\"a}r I} and Jakob Stensballe and Roberto Oliveri and Wade, {Charles E} and Ostrowski, {Sisse R} and Holcomb, {John B}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2014 American Society of Hematology.",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1182/blood-2014-05-575340",
language = "English",
volume = "124",
pages = "3052--8",
journal = "Blood",
issn = "0006-4971",
publisher = "American Society of Hematology",
number = "20",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage

AU - Johansson, Pär I

AU - Stensballe, Jakob

AU - Oliveri, Roberto

AU - Wade, Charles E

AU - Ostrowski, Sisse R

AU - Holcomb, John B

N1 - Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hematology.

PY - 2014/10/7

Y1 - 2014/10/7

N2 - Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids and red blood cells (RBC) in the early phase, and plasma and platelets in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid 1990ties, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance of the adequacy of whole blood hemostatic tests to monitor these patients. Thus, in 2005, a strategy aiming at avoiding coagulopathy by pro-active resuscitation with blood products in a balanced ratio of RBC:plasma:platelets was introduced and this has been reported to be associated with reduced mortality in observational studies. Concurrently, whole blood viscoelastic hemostatic assays (VHA) have gained acceptance by allowing a rapid and timely identification of coagulopathy along with enabling an individualized, goal-directed transfusion therapy. These strategies joined together seem beneficial for patient outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We here present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage.

AB - Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids and red blood cells (RBC) in the early phase, and plasma and platelets in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid 1990ties, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance of the adequacy of whole blood hemostatic tests to monitor these patients. Thus, in 2005, a strategy aiming at avoiding coagulopathy by pro-active resuscitation with blood products in a balanced ratio of RBC:plasma:platelets was introduced and this has been reported to be associated with reduced mortality in observational studies. Concurrently, whole blood viscoelastic hemostatic assays (VHA) have gained acceptance by allowing a rapid and timely identification of coagulopathy along with enabling an individualized, goal-directed transfusion therapy. These strategies joined together seem beneficial for patient outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We here present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage.

U2 - 10.1182/blood-2014-05-575340

DO - 10.1182/blood-2014-05-575340

M3 - Journal article

VL - 124

SP - 3052

EP - 3058

JO - Blood

JF - Blood

SN - 0006-4971

IS - 20

ER -

ID: 44608083