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Horizontally acquired papGII-containing pathogenicity islands underlie the emergence of invasive uropathogenic Escherichia coli lineages

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Biggel, Michael ; Xavier, Basil B ; Johnson, James R ; Nielsen, Karen L ; Frimodt-Møller, Niels ; Matheeussen, Veerle ; Goossens, Herman ; Moons, Pieter ; Van Puyvelde, Sandra. / Horizontally acquired papGII-containing pathogenicity islands underlie the emergence of invasive uropathogenic Escherichia coli lineages. In: Nature Communications. 2020 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 5968.

Bibtex

@article{221045def1a2473aa3fe2a473f7f718a,
title = "Horizontally acquired papGII-containing pathogenicity islands underlie the emergence of invasive uropathogenic Escherichia coli lineages",
abstract = "Escherichia coli is the leading cause of urinary tract infection, one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. Despite this, a genomic perspective is lacking regarding the phylogenetic distribution of isolates associated with different clinical syndromes. Here, we present a large-scale phylogenomic analysis of a spatiotemporally and clinically diverse set of 907 E. coli isolates, including 722 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates. A genome-wide association approach identifies the (P-fimbriae-encoding) papGII locus as the key feature distinguishing invasive UPEC, defined as isolates associated with severe UTI, i.e., kidney infection (pyelonephritis) or urinary-source bacteremia, from non-invasive UPEC, defined as isolates associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria or bladder infection (cystitis). Within the E. coli population, distinct invasive UPEC lineages emerged through repeated horizontal acquisition of diverse papGII-containing pathogenicity islands. Our findings elucidate the molecular determinants of severe UTI and have implications for the early detection of this pathogen.",
keywords = "Adhesins, Escherichia coli/genetics, DNA, Bacterial/genetics, Escherichia coli Infections/microbiology, Fimbriae, Bacterial/genetics, Gene Transfer, Horizontal/genetics, Genome, Bacterial, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomic Islands/genetics, Humans, Phylogeny, Urinary Tract/microbiology, Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology, Uropathogenic Escherichia coli/genetics, Virulence Factors/genetics",
author = "Michael Biggel and Xavier, {Basil B} and Johnson, {James R} and Nielsen, {Karen L} and Niels Frimodt-M{\o}ller and Veerle Matheeussen and Herman Goossens and Pieter Moons and {Van Puyvelde}, Sandra",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
day = "24",
doi = "10.1038/s41467-020-19714-9",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "5968",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Horizontally acquired papGII-containing pathogenicity islands underlie the emergence of invasive uropathogenic Escherichia coli lineages

AU - Biggel, Michael

AU - Xavier, Basil B

AU - Johnson, James R

AU - Nielsen, Karen L

AU - Frimodt-Møller, Niels

AU - Matheeussen, Veerle

AU - Goossens, Herman

AU - Moons, Pieter

AU - Van Puyvelde, Sandra

PY - 2020/11/24

Y1 - 2020/11/24

N2 - Escherichia coli is the leading cause of urinary tract infection, one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. Despite this, a genomic perspective is lacking regarding the phylogenetic distribution of isolates associated with different clinical syndromes. Here, we present a large-scale phylogenomic analysis of a spatiotemporally and clinically diverse set of 907 E. coli isolates, including 722 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates. A genome-wide association approach identifies the (P-fimbriae-encoding) papGII locus as the key feature distinguishing invasive UPEC, defined as isolates associated with severe UTI, i.e., kidney infection (pyelonephritis) or urinary-source bacteremia, from non-invasive UPEC, defined as isolates associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria or bladder infection (cystitis). Within the E. coli population, distinct invasive UPEC lineages emerged through repeated horizontal acquisition of diverse papGII-containing pathogenicity islands. Our findings elucidate the molecular determinants of severe UTI and have implications for the early detection of this pathogen.

AB - Escherichia coli is the leading cause of urinary tract infection, one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. Despite this, a genomic perspective is lacking regarding the phylogenetic distribution of isolates associated with different clinical syndromes. Here, we present a large-scale phylogenomic analysis of a spatiotemporally and clinically diverse set of 907 E. coli isolates, including 722 uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) isolates. A genome-wide association approach identifies the (P-fimbriae-encoding) papGII locus as the key feature distinguishing invasive UPEC, defined as isolates associated with severe UTI, i.e., kidney infection (pyelonephritis) or urinary-source bacteremia, from non-invasive UPEC, defined as isolates associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria or bladder infection (cystitis). Within the E. coli population, distinct invasive UPEC lineages emerged through repeated horizontal acquisition of diverse papGII-containing pathogenicity islands. Our findings elucidate the molecular determinants of severe UTI and have implications for the early detection of this pathogen.

KW - Adhesins, Escherichia coli/genetics

KW - DNA, Bacterial/genetics

KW - Escherichia coli Infections/microbiology

KW - Fimbriae, Bacterial/genetics

KW - Gene Transfer, Horizontal/genetics

KW - Genome, Bacterial

KW - Genome-Wide Association Study

KW - Genomic Islands/genetics

KW - Humans

KW - Phylogeny

KW - Urinary Tract/microbiology

KW - Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology

KW - Uropathogenic Escherichia coli/genetics

KW - Virulence Factors/genetics

U2 - 10.1038/s41467-020-19714-9

DO - 10.1038/s41467-020-19714-9

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33235212

VL - 11

SP - 5968

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 61827370