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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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High suPAR and Low Blood Eosinophil Count are Risk Factors for Hospital Readmission and Mortality in Patients with COPD

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Introduction: The biomarker soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has been associated with increased mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), while elevated blood eosinophils have been associated with better survival. We hypothesized that suPAR and blood eosinophil count are independent risk factors for readmission and mortality after an acute admission in patients with COPD.

Methods: This retrospective cohort study comprised 4022 patients with prevalent COPD acutely admitted to Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark. Irrespective of cause of admission, suPAR and blood eosinophils were measured, and patients were followed up to 365 days. Associations with 365-day respiratory readmission, all-cause readmission and all-cause mortality were investigated by Cox regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, Charlson score and C-reactive protein.

Results: suPAR was significantly elevated in patients who later experienced readmission or died. At 365 days, hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause readmission and mortality reached 1.61 (95% CI 1.40-1.85; p<0.0001) and 3.40 (95% CI 2.64-4.39; p<0.0001), respectively, for COPD patients in the fourth suPAR quartile compared to patients in the first suPAR quartile. High blood eosinophils (>300 cells/μL) were associated with lower risk of mortality (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.39-0.62; p<0.0001) compared with patients with <150 cells/μL. When stratifying patients by suPAR quartiles and blood eosinophil counts, the highest relative mortality rate was found in patients belonging to both the fourth suPAR quartile and the low blood eosinophil (<150 cells/μL) group.

Conclusion: In this cohort of COPD patients acutely admitted to a hospital, elevated suPAR concentrations were associated with both higher risk of all-cause readmission and mortality, whereas higher blood eosinophil count was associated with lower risk of mortality.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Volume15
Pages (from-to)733-743
Number of pages11
ISSN1178-2005
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Apr 2020

    Research areas

  • Acute admission, Biomarker, Hospitalization, Inflammation, Prognosis, Retrospective cohort

ID: 59698784