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High risk - what's next? A survey study on decisional conflict, regret and satisfaction among high-risk pregnant women making choices about further prenatal testing for fetal aneuploidy

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DOI

  1. Corrigendum for Hartwig TS, Sørensen S and Jørgensen FS (2016) https://doi.org/10.1002/pd.4833

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OBJECTIVES: To investigate decision making among pregnant women when choosing between noninvasive prenatal testing, invasive testing, or no further testing.

METHODS: Women with a high-risk result from the first trimester screening were invited to fill in two online questionnaires at gestational age 12 to 14 (Q1) and 24 weeks (Q2). The scales used were Decisional Conflict and Regret Scales, Satisfaction with genetic Counselling Scale, and Health-Relevant Personality Inventory.

RESULTS: Three hundred thirty-nine women agreed to participate, and the response rates were 76% on Q1 and 88% on Q2. A percentage of 75.4% chose an invasive test, 23.8% chose noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), 0.4% chose no further testing, and 0.4% had both NIPT and invasive testing. Among all participants, 13.3% had a high level of decisional conflict. We found that choosing NIPT was associated with a high decisional conflict (p = 0.013), receiving genetic counselling the same day was associated with a high decisional conflict (p = 0.039), and a high satisfaction with the genetic counselling was associated with low decisional conflict (p < 0.001). Furthermore, the personality subtrait "alexithymia" was associated with low decisional conflict (p = 0.043). There was a significant association between high decisional conflict and later decisional regret (p = 0.008).

CONCLUSION: We present evidence that satisfaction with and timing of counselling are important factors to limit decisional conflict. Interestingly, women choosing NIPT had more decisional conflict than women choosing invasive testing.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPrenatal Diagnosis
Volume39
Issue number8
Pages (from-to)635-642
Number of pages8
ISSN0197-3851
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

Bibliographical note

© 2019 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

ID: 57167002